English River Website
500 Years of Pointer History and Trivia ...
and Other Interesting Facts

1500s
Paintings

"Pointers are one of the oldest breeds of sporting dogs and can be seen in paintings dating from 1500." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"

"The first likeness of a pointing-dog that I have found is a pencil sketch of a head by an Italian, Pisanello (1380-1456), which is supported by a painting attributed to Titian (1477-1576), and by a picture by Bassano (1510-1592), at Madrid. The scene of this last is laid in the Garden of Eden; and here in a corner is a "bracco" staunchly pointing partridges." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predecessors




ReturnReturn


1700s
Introduction into England

"It has, however, been established beyond much doubt that the earliest introduction of the pointing dog into England would have been by about 1700. There is an early record that pointing dogs were first heard of in England about the time of Lord Peterborough's campaign in Spain in the War of the Spanish Succession. This commenced in 1704 and was ended by the Peace of Utrecht in 1713. It was in this year that the British Army returned to England, and it is thought that British officers serving with the army were so impressed with the wonderful pointing dogs of Spain during the nine years spent in that country that on their return home they brought back with them specimens of the breed." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"




"Spanish ??? Pointer"

"(The Pointer) was for long indentified as the "Spanish" Pointer, but one still lacks documentation that can actually verify a long-held belief that he originated there. Even wealthy, dedicated William Arkwright (The Pointer and His Predecessors, 1902) who spent time and money searching Spanish archives for his magnificent book that remains the breed classic, found no support for the claim. One does not even have the support that the art of the great painters and weavers gave to the history of other Sporting breeds. Few indeed are the dogs of any kind on Spanish canvases. ... "Spanish Pointer" came into England as a name for a dog that seems to have been introduced in the late 18th century. The Elizabethans gave no hint of having known of such a one in their earlier times. Maybe introduction was made as from the time of the British armies fighting in Flanders. The pages of all dog history, right into our own time, are crammed with evidence that after wars soldiers brought home dogs as, after cruises, sailors traditionally brought home parrots. This was the period of Spanish occupation of the Low Countries, and beyond doubt Spanish officers took their hunting dogs to war as did the British. Gentlemen wanted their recreation between battles in those times. Then, if a novel kind of dog was "acquired" ... by British officers from Spanish opposite numbers, the dog would reasonably have been dubbed "Spanish" when his new owners took him home." -- C. Bede Maxwell, 1972, The Truth About Sporting Dogs"

[for MORE Spanish Pointer see "1850s - Three Types of Pointers" below]




The Spanish Pointer

Spanish Pointer, click to enlarge "The Spanish Pointer"
"Up to the time when firearms were beginning to be popular, setters and spaniels had been used to find game and to drive birds into nets, but as more came to be known of the Spanish pointer it was apparently considered that he alone had the capacity to find game for the gun. The Spanish pointer was a very slow but accurate worker, and this was necessary at the time of the old-fashioned flintlock gun." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London" -- Image, scanned from Philips, 1971, from engraving by J.Scott after Philip Reinagle.

[for MORE Spanish Pointer see "1850s - Three Types of Pointers" below]




The Pointing-Dog

"'The Best way to take partridges, as is done by princes and nobles, is to shoot the birds neatly, with a pointing-dog; or to take them by means of a pointing-dog and nets. Before I continue, it is necessary to describe the pointing-dog, which is used with the hawk, for shooting or hawking. This sort of dog is usually white and brown marked, or white and speckled, or brown spotted, and the taller and stronger the better the dog, so that he can take the scent high: for pointing-dogs should always hunt with noses high in the air'" -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predecessors, quote from Täntzer, 1734, Der Dianen Hohe und Niedere Jagd-geheimnisse




The Pointing-Dog and Nets

"'Whe the dog points he should not be called to, but encouraged with "gently!" so that he may stand still, until such time as the fowling-net can be got ready. Then run rapidly on to the game and the dog, so that the net cover both, and having strangled the birds give the dog some bread. At first the dog will hate the net, but must be well trained to endure it patiently, and as it is rare to find a dog combine both qualities (pointing, and standing to the net), it is wise for the sportsman to have two dogs, one for each purpose. And as the partridges will not often stay quiet a conveniently long time before the dog, not to mention the net, but scatter themselves away, the hunter must have with him his hawk, which the game will recognise as their enemy, and will crouch upon the ground and hide from it, lying motionless before the pointing-dog until the net covers both them and him'." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predecessors, quote from Täntzer, 1734, Der Dianen Hohe und Niedere Jagd-geheimnisse




The Pointing-Dog and Hawks

"'Take a pointing-dog, a hooded hawk, and a living pigeon on a long string in the game-bag, and start early. When the dog finds and points, hastily unhood the hawk, call warning to the dog, and as soon as conviently near to him (holding the hawk with its breast to the partridges and the dog), call out to him: "Berr!" On which, the dog springs into the middle of the partridges. They scatter off like dust, and the hawk after them. Then the hunter rides till the hawk strikes, and falls with his quarry to the ground'." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predecessors, quote from Täntzer, 1734, Der Dianen Hohe und Niedere Jagd-geheimnisse




Late 1700s - Foxhound Crosses - "Col. Thornton's Dash"

"It was in the last years of the eighteenth century that the crying sin against the pointer was committed, by mating him with the foxhound. Had he been crossed once again with the tender-nosed, sagacious, southern hound, the effect would not have been disastrous; but the dashing, harum-scarum foxhound was an exemplarily mischievous selection. ... Colonel Thornton (1757-1823), who kept both foxhounds and pointers, was the first to intermix the two breeds." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predecessors

"The first person to have success with a pointer from adding foxhound blood was a Colonel Thornton. He kept both foxhounds and pointers and he mated a small pointer bitch and a shallow flewed foxhound and from this mating produced a dog by the name of "Dash". At the time, some people were of the opinion that it was perhaps unfortunate that he should have succeeded in breeding so soon an eminent dog like "Dash", for this dog was remarkable for his style of ranging on the moors as well as for his superior method of finding game. He was equally excellent in partridge shooting and backed other dogs as steadily as possible. He was used at stud to a considerable number of bitches but not one puppy which he sired ever made the grade for work! However, it was through the success of "Dash" in the field that many breeders in all parts of the country also decided to use the foxhound cross, but it soon became evident that these crosses were no good generally and that far more was lost than gained by the experiment. It had produced courage, power and perseverance, but also high spirits and keenness for chasing." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"

"In fact if the truth could be ascertained, it would be much more reasonable to believe that this mongrel was produced in an effort to improve the speed of Thronton's hounds on which he was makeing large wagers in competing for speed records." -- Phillips, 1970, The True Pointer

Pointer x Foxhound crosses in the late 1800s.

"Again, that well-known sportsman, Colonel Welfitt, who owned both foxhounds and pointers, told me that he had put his pointer bitches to a foxhound, and while showing me the offspring remarked that they were 'handsome but very headstrong.' He bred these with two of my mother's pointers, "Don (811)" and "General (4970)", of Mr. Whitehouse's strain, and finally he presented us with a puppy, "Don Jose (9019)". This was a handsome sort of dog, and won several prizes, but he was impossible to break properly, and his puppies out of six of our bitches were not much better."
-- Arkwright, 1906, p.155

(Col. Thornton's Foxhound x Pointer)
[Pedigree, etc.]

(Arkwright's Foxhound x Pointer)
[Pedigree, etc.]




ReturnReturn


1800s
The "Pointer"

"The Spanish pointer was a very slow but accurate worker, and this was necessary at the time of the old-fashioned flintlock gun ... but as progress was made in the type of gun used, the pace of hunting was increased and it became clear that a dog with more speed was what was required, so with the Englishman's flair for breeding excellent livestock, work was done on the raw material already obtained to create the pointer as it is known today. It was adapted, blended and vastly improved. It is thought that this was done by selective breeding and not by crossing. There is evidence through portraits that pointers had been altogether changed by the year 1800 which was when the "pointer" came to be the name used for the breed. It had taken just 100 years of careful breeding and selection to bring the pointer to perfection with the added invention of "backing", which is the co-operation in work of two or more dogs." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"

"It may have been that the Pointer was brought into England from both France and Spain. Be it that it may, it is the English sportsman to whom we are indebted for the "development" of the Pointer." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951




Pioneering English Breeders of Pointers

"Among the pioneering English breeders of Pointers were: Thomas Webb Edge, George John Legh, J.C. Antrobus, Lord Combermere, Sir Vincent Corbet, the Earl of Sefton, Thomas Statter, Lord Derby, Sir Richard Garth, J.W. Whitehouse, R.J. Lloyd Price, J. Lang, and George Moore. These were not all, of course, and many others who contributed much came later." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951




ReturnReturn


1820s
1820 - A Litter of Nineteen

"A pointer bitch, the property of Thomas Sherwood, Esq. of Cannon Hill, Surrey, whelped in September last, nineteen puppies alive and in perfect health. These puppies were got by a smooth-haired pointer, whose sire was a thorough-bred setter; and in this instance good proof is given of breeding back, since one part of the litter possess the true character of the pointer, while the other part shew equally strong the character of the setter. It became necessary to remove some of the puppies to nurses, but eight of them are still living and becoming fine dogs." -- The Sporting Magazine, April 1821, p.56




ReturnReturn


1840s
1844 - the Edge of Strelly Sale

"Thomas Webb Edge died in 1844 and on October 1, of that year, his dogs were sold at public auction. The sale was a means of distributing a line of well established pointer blood among a number of well known breeders of that period." -- Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer

[MORE about the Sale]




ReturnReturn


1850s
1850s -- Three Types of Pointers

Group of Pointers, 1859 Three Types of Pointers.

POINTERS (SPANISH AND ENGLISH):

"In this country there are several varieties of the pointer still tolerably distinct from each other, but all running the one into the other so as to make the divisions far from distinct. Of these varieties, the old Spanish dog, now very rare, the heavy English pointer, and the light English dog, may be taken as the three types, as exhibited on the opposite page [click on image above].

The old Spanish pointer is now very seldom met with, but he is undoubtedly the original of all the existing breeds. The Spanish dog is generally considered to be descended from the hound, one of which is supposed to have shown a disposition to point, and this faculty being encouraged and "bred to", in time there has been produced the peculiar animal which is now so common. ...

The modern English pointer is the result of a cross of the Spanish dog with the greyhound or foxhound, by which the delicacy of the nerves of the nose, and of the other parts of the nervous system, is to a certain extent diminished, while the body is rendered much more light and elegant. In proportion to the amount of Spanish blood in any breed is the size of the head, while according to the number of crosses from the greyhound or foxhound is the body made light, strong, and active. The former of these is the better of the two for the purpose of crossing with the Spanish pointer, because he gives all the advantages of the foxhound without the disadvantage of the tendency to stoop in hunting and to chase "fur". ... It is said that some breeds, though light and acrive, are descended from pure-bred Spanish pointer by choosing out the lightest puppies to continue the breed; but I fully believe that none are free from one or other of the strains above mentioned, excepting those which show a certain degree of heaviness about the shoulders and disproportion between the hind and fore quarters, which is not by any means desirable. This, however, is purely conjectural, as there are few pedigrees which can be traced back for many generations. The late Mr. Edge's breed is said to be so descended, and probably it can be carried back as far as any other; but even his is lost in obscurity, and cannot be proved to be pure any more than those of Lord Derby or Lord Sefton. ..."

-- from: "Sporting Rifle: and The Dogs, Ponies, Ferrets, &c., Used with Them in the Various Kinds of Shooting and Trapping", by Stonehenge, Roultedge, Warne, and Routledge, London, 1859

[MORE about Edge pointers]




1859 - First "Dog Show" (England)

"Even before the Kennel Club was founded, the first dog show in this country was held in Newcastle upon Tyne in the year of 1859, being exclusively for Pointers and Setters and run in conjunction with a poultry show." -- C.A. Robertshaw, 2000, Pointers Past & Present

"First dog show, held in Newcastle-on-Tyne, open to pointers and setters alone. Judges gave the prize to a liver-and-white dog." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predicessors

"The first dog show was held in the New Corn Exchange, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, on 29 and 30 June 1859 (Newcastle Race Week). The show was of particular interest to pointer people as it was confined to pointers and setters." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"

" ... 23 entries for pointers and 37 for setters, many being from distant parts of the kingdom. Among them were some very splendid specimens of their kinds; ... the palm for the best setter was carried off by William Jobling Esq. of Morpeth, that for pointers being gained by J. Brailsford Esq., Knowsley, Lancashire. ... The pointer judges were Mr. G. H. Walsh of London (who wrote sporting articles under the name of Stonehenge), Mr. Joseph Jobling, Morpeth, and Mr. Thomas Robson of Newcastle, and the awards were as follows: Best of Breed winning one of Pape's celebrated double barrelled guns worth from L15-20, J. Brailsford Esq., Knowsley. Very Highly Commended, George Atkinson Esq., Hall Farm, Seaham, John Angus Esq., Percy Street, Newcastle. Highly Commended, Mr. John Charlton, Newcastle, Charles Lloyd Esq., Howick, Alnwick, and Edward Cowan, Blaydon. Commended, Charles Hibbert, Esq., Smallshaw, Ashton Under Lyne, and Mr. Thomas Scott, of Longhirst. There were 23 competitors." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London, from copy of the show report which appeared in 'Newcastle Courant' of Friday, 1 July 1859"

(From the pen of Mr. W. R. Pape of Newcastle-on-Tyne, 1894) "It is now about forty years since I started to breed my black pointers, and have had them ever since. ... I got up the first dog show that was held in Newcastle, 1859. Mr. Angus, a friend of mine, had a young black dog at the show, one of my breed, and, although the judges gave the prize to a liver-and-white dog, Mr. Walsh, the Editor of the Field, said in the Field, on reporting the show, that this dog, to his fancy, was the finest pointer dog there." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predecessors




ReturnReturn


1860s
1860 - "Bird's Bob" - Lemon and Whites

"Contemporary with the Antrobus, Edge, Sefton, and Moore of Appleby strains, of which "Brockton's Bounce" and "Statter's Major" were the leading lights, there existed a breed of lemon and whites which had a small, but enthusiastic following. Chief among these was H. Gilbert, who owned two dogs called "Bob" and "Major". Lemon and whites, before the era of field trials and dog shows, were not generally popular, but with the advent of public competitions the Gilbert dogs and a few other became better known and steadily rose in popular favor, for they exemplified the handsome, lithe, clean-cut type of pointer which proved to be very attractive when shown beside the "Bounce" and "Major" varieties. In the field these lemon and whites demonstrated that they had speed, style and endurance far in excess of the liver and whites and once they came before the public, it was not long until others took them up. "Gilbert's Bob" became the property of Mr. Bird, who exhibited him at the second show of the Birmingham Kennel Club which was held in 1860. At this event "Bob" took first prize." -- A. F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer

(Bird's Bob: lemon/white, Baddock's Joker x Lang's Fan)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1865 - First "Field Trial" (England)

"First "working trial", held near Bedford" -- Arkwright, 1906

"In 1865, again before the Kennel Club was founded in 1873, the first field trial was held at Bedford." -- C.A. Robertshaw, 2000, Pointers Past & Present

""Brockton's Bounce" was a magnificent dog, and he was the first pointer that ever won a field trial in England." -- EKC, September 1881

""Brockton's Bounce" was a magnificent dog, a winner on the show bench, and of the first Field Trial in England." -- G.S. Lowe, 1907, The New Book of the Dog

"... the inaugural trials of all ... This was at Southill in 1865, when the Pointers were divided into large and small sizes, the former including "Mr. W.R. Brockton's Bounce" and "Mr. W.G. Newton's Ranger", and the latter "Mr. J.H. Whitehouse's Hamlet". In a maximum of 40 for nose, "Bounce" and "Hamlet" were accredited full marks, "Bounce" taking the highest compliment too in pace and range, and also for temperament. He was, therefore, estimated by the judges, the Rev. T. Pearce and Mr. Walker, of Halifax, to have been absolutely perfect. "Hamlet" was the same, both taking 90 in a hundred, but "Ranger" only got 30 for nose, and half marks for pace. This tallied much with his character at home, as although a good, steady, workmanlike dog, he yet was never quite brilliant, such as "Bounce" had the credit of being, and the late Mr. Whitehouse, a capital sportsman, would always contend that he never shot over a better than "Hamlet". -- G.S. Lowe, 1907, The New Book of the Dog

""Brockton's Bounce" ran in the first field trial in the April of 1865, held over the estates of Mr. S. Whitbread. Judging was done by the Rev. T. Pearce whose nom de plume was "Idestone" and Mr. John Walker of Halifax. For this first field trial the dogs were scored on a points system; a certain number counting for each qualification a field dog should possess. Sir Richard Garth's "Jill" and Mr. Flemming's "Dandy" made a perfect score of 100% whilst "Brockton's Bounce" and "Whitehouse's Hamlet" scored 90% each. ... Entrants competing at this trial consisted of nine Pointers and seven Setters, which with one or two exceptions, later competed at the Islington Dog Show in June, with Hamlet taking the first prize in the Champion Class for Small Size Stud Pointers tried in the field." -- C.A. Robertshaw, 2000, Pointers Past & Present




1868 - "Garth's Drake" whelped

Drake, from an oil by George Earl, click to enlarge "Garth's Drake"
"From every source, it is clear that the most outstanding performer in the field in the latter part of the nineteenth century was "Sir Richard Garth's Drake", born in 1868. He became the first pointer champion at field trials. G.S. Lowe, writing about pointers in 1907, gives this description of Drake after he had seen him win in field trials near Stafford. "Drake was a rather gaunt dog with immense depth of girth, long shoulders, long haunches, and a benevolent quiet countenance. There was nothing very attractive about him walking about prior to the Trial, but the moment he was down he seemed to paralyse his opponent, as he went half as fast again. ... Quite a sight it was to watch him on 'point'. It was perhaps more of a drop than a 'point'. ... Nothing in his day could beat him in the field."" -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London, image from an oil by George Earl, from Enos Phillips, 1970, The True Pointer and His Ancient Heritage, click to enlarge"

"Among notable gundog-lovers we now come to Sir Richard Garth, who during all his long life has been enthusiastic about shooting over dogs, was one of the most successful competitors at the beginning of pointer and setter Trials, and was the breeder of the renowned "Drake". When he left as Chief Justice for Calcutta in 1875, he sold his dogs at Tattersall's." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predicessors

(Garth's Rap x Garth's Doll)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1869(?)-1895 - The Pointer Club (England)

"The first-ever field trials was held near Bedford in 1865. After that event a field trial society was formed and known as the Pointer Club. This club held its first trial in 1869 and each following year until it was abandoned in 1895. (The present Pointer Club was formed in 1960.)" -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"




1860s - 1870s - "Whitehouse's Hamlet"

Whitehouse's Hamlet, from oil by George Earl, click to enlarge "Whitehouse's Hamlet"
"Mr. Whitehouse of Ipsley Court, Redditch, was in his day an equally eminent pointer-breeder. In his strain of lemon-and-whites he contrived to concentrate by far the purest blood that remains nowadays in this country. He bred "Hamlet", a dog equally remarkable in the field and at stud." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predicessors; Image from an oil painting by George Earl, from W. Enos Phillips, The True Pointer and His Ancient Heritage, 1970

(Bird's Bob x Whitehouse's Juno)
[Pedigree, etc.]




"The Four Cornerstones"

""Brockton's Bounce", "Statter's Major", "Whitehouse's Hamlet", "Garth's Drake"! What names to conjure up visions of past glory in the game-fields of England! Mention this quartet and you have named the four cornerstones in the foundation of the Point breed. Add the name of "Price's Champion Bang" and you have heralded the principal fountainhead as we know it in this country today." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(Brockton's Bounce: Duke of Newcastle x Whitehouse's Juno)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Statter's Major: Old Major x Garth's Mite)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Whitehouse's Hamlet: Bird's Bob x Whitehouse's Juno)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Garth's Drake: Garth's Rap x Garth's Doll)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Price's Bang: Coham's Bang x Price's Vesta)
[Pedigree, etc.]




ReturnReturn


1870s
1873 - English Kennel Club

"... the Kennel Club was founded in 1873 ... " -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"




1874 - English Kennel Club Stud Book

"In 1874 a hybrid committee was set up to design the first Kennel Club Sutd book, free entries being allocated to show dogs that had won a prize and field trial competitors regardless of having won a prize. Mr. W. Lort, a qualified surgeoun, credited with originating the stud book for Pointers and Setters, was well known for his Pointers, Setters, and black Spaniels, along with some fair racehorses and perhaps the best trotting horses this side of the Atlantic." -- C. A. Robertshaw, 2000, Pointers Past & Present




1874 - "Sensation" whelped

Sensation "Westminster Sensation"
"When the Westminster Kennel Club was organized, in the early seventies, its object was more for the improvement of the pointer than that of holding shows, and in those days it maintained elaborate kennels at Babylon, L. I., where the breeding and the rearing of the short-haired gun dog was carried on rather extensively. There is no question whatever but this club did much for the breed in various ways, and while some of their importations were not quite up to expectations, the fact remains that its influence was an important one in raising the standard of all dogs in America, and particularly the breed to which it was especially devoted. In 1876 they brought over a pointer from England which was registered in this country under the name of "Sensation", and the selection of that name, at least, was a particularly happy one, coming at a time when importations -- that is, authentic ones -- were few, and when the pointer needed the stimulus of good English blood. In England this dog was registered under the name of "Don"; breeder, J.R. Humphreys; owner, R. Parr." -- A.F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer

"The first great Pointer which the Club owned was named "Sensation". He was said to have the best head of any Pointer in the world. Through the years, the Club has done well to preserve his memory by adopting his picture as the club logo." -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, August 2000

(w: February 1874, lemon/white, Price's Jim x Humphrey's Nell)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1874 - First public field trial in America - "Rex" Placing Sixth

"The first public field trial in America was held at Memphis, Tenn., October 8, 1874. The winner was "Knight", a black Setter dog belonging to H. Clark Pritchett. The stake was sponsored by the Tennessee State Sportsmen's Association and the judges were J.W. Burton and J.H. Acklen. The contest was the result of some rather heated arguments among the members concerning the field merits of their repective dogs." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

"The first formal field trial for pointing dogs was held near Memphis, Tennessee, on October 8, 1874. At that time the competitors were judged on a number system, with the best possible score being 100. Nose was allotted a maximum of 30 points; pace and style, 20; breaking (steadiness), 20; pointing style and staunchness, 15; backing, 10; roading, 5. The winning dog of this trial scored 88 points. -- Rice and Dahl, Hunting Dogs, revised 1978

1874 - Tennessee State Sportsmen's Association, Inaugural Trials held Memphis, Tenn., October 8, 1874. Judges: J.W. Burton and J.H. Acklen. "Free For All Stakes". First prize, a silver service. 12 Entries. 1) "Knight", Setter, black, 88pts., owner: H. Clark Prichitt, handler: owner; 2) "Romp", English Setter, 86pts., owner: T.M. Horsfall, handler: owner; 3) "Guido", Dropper, 80pts., owner: W.A. Wheatley, handler: owner; 4) "Mack", Setter, 78pts., owner: J.H. Dew, handler: owner; 5) "Addie", Setter, 72pts., owner: W.A. Wheatley, handler: owner; 6) "Rex", Pointer, black and white, 67pts., owner: A. Merriman, handler: owner; 7) "Bang", breed not listed, 64pts., owner: Wm. Carroll, handler: H. Greer; 8) "Frank", Setter, liver and white, 69pts., owner: D. Stevens, handler: owner; 9) "Dixie", Setter, 57pts., owner: A. Francis, handler: owner. -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907, Field Trial Record of Dogs in America




1876 - "Official Registrations"

"Correctly speaking, there is no such animal as a "native pointer", but custom has given the term a definite sanction, and now it is generally understood to embrace all those dogs, or their descendants, which flourished in this country from Colonial times up to the epoch of the first authentic importations, which was about 1876, when official books began to be published for the registration of dogs. The first of these publications was "The American Kennel and Sporting Field," by Arnold Burges, which came off the press of J.B. Ford and Company, New York, in 1876. The formation of the National American Kennel Club followed, then the American Kennel Stud Book, published by the late Dr. N. Rowe and from this it was but a short stop to the formation of the American Kennel Club." -- A.F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer



1876 - "Burges's American Kennel and Sporting Field"

"Owing to the fact that no stud book, official or otherwise, was published prior to the "American Kennel and Sporting Field", which was placed before the dog loving public in 1876, it is difficult to obtain authentic records of dogs that lived in the early days of the nineteenth century, or in fact, before about 1865." -- A.F. Hochwalt, 1911, Pointers and Setters

"The first of these publications was "The American Kennel and Sporting Field," by Arnold Burges, which came off the press of J.B. Ford and Company, New York, in 1876." -- A.F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer




1876 - "Orgill's Champion Rush"

Orgills Rush, click to enlarge "Orgill's Rush"
"The so-called 'native' Pointers of the early days also played their part in the development of the Pointer of this country. One of the most famous was "Champion Rush", bred and owned by Mr. Edmund Orgill, a very careful and thoughtful breeder who preferred the white and lemons. "Rush" was a successful bench show winner. -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(lemon/white, w: April 1876, Flake x Lily)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1877 - Westminster - "First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs"

"The Westminster Kennel Club started as a small, private gentlemen's club devoted to the sport of hunting with dogs and became one of the most prestigious dog shows in the world. ... At the very beginning, these gentlemen wanted to provide a forum for comparing the conformation of dogs against each other. They were aware of success of dog shows in England and the few that had been held on a limited scale in the US, so they had an idea of what kind of an event they wanted. Westminster's first show was in 1877. Held at Gilmore's Garden (which is no longer standing), the show was called the “First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs.” This four-day event on May 8th thru 11th of that year attracted an entry of 1177 dogs. Westminster's logo pointer, "Sensation", who was owned by the kennel club, was entered in exhibition only at this first show and at subsequent shows. Yet, he was a successful show dog who was the “Winner of seven prizes in England, and first at Baltimore and divided with "Rock" for best dog in show.” -- Sari B. Tietjen, "Westminster - An Historical Perspective", AKC Website, 1999

"In 1876, noting the success of dog shows held in England and one in Philadelphia, it was decided to present a dog show in New York City. Adopting the name of the hotel in which they met as the name of the dog show, this group of sportsmen presented the "First Annual New York Bench Show of Dogs." Produced by the Westminster Kennel Club, the show was held in Gilmore's Gardens, Madison Avenue and 26th Street, on May 8th through the 10th, 1877. This first dog show was so successful with exhibitors and the public that it was extended to include another day, May 11th. With a few exceptions in the early years, the Westminster Dog Show continues to be held at Madison Square Garden. In 1888, the Club moved its date from May to February, where it has remained ever since. Since the first show in 1877 through 1920, Westminster continued as a four-day show. Then in 1921 through 1940, the show was condensed into a three day show. Finally, in present day, Westminster continues to present a two-day show. Westminster is the oldest, continuous sporting event in America, with the exception of the Kentucky Derby. It has been held each year despite power shortages, hazardous snow storms, national depressions, and World Wars. -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, 2002

[Westminster Breed Winners and 1877 Show Entries]




1878 - First pointer registered with AKC - "Ace of Spades", AKC#1187

"Breeding records existed in the United States long before the American Kennel Club was founded in 1884, but most were kept by private individuals. In 1886, the AKC decided that a reliable record of pedigrees was vital to the advancement of the sport of purebred dogs, and it began negotiating with the two existing stud books, the American Kennel Register and the National American Kennel Club. Although the former declined the AKC's offer, Dr. N. Rowe (who had published Volumes II and II of the National American Kennel Club Stud Book at his own expense) agreed to hand over the National American Kennel Club's three volumes. Containing a list of 5,397 dogs, these volumes became the basis of the AKC's Stud Book, which has been in continuous publication since 1887." -- AKC, The Complete Dog Book, 19th Edition, Revised, 1997

"The first dog to appear in the AKC's Stud Book was "Adonis", an English Setter whelped in 1875. Anonis was owned and bred by George Delano of New Bedford, Massachusetts." -- AKC, The Complete Dog Book, 19th Edition, Revised, 1997

(black, w: 1875, Button x Topsey)
[Pedigree, etc.]




Late 1870s - American Importation - "Sleaford", "Bow", and "Faust"

Bow, from J.M. Tracy, click to enlarge "Bow"
"The Westminster Kennel Club and the St. Louis Kennel Club, two organizations interested in Pointers, imported a number of good ones and some which did not exactly please the American fancy. The St. Louis group imported "Sleaford" in 1877, but had indifferent success. Undaunted, they continued their importations. In 1877, they secured, through E. C. Stirling, the heavyweight, white and liver "Bow", imported by T. H. Scott. He proved a bench show winner and also placed in field trials. In 1879, S. A. Kaye, a member of the club, imported "Faust", paying $1,350, the largest price to be paid for a Pointer in America up to that time. "Faust" enjoyed a series of bench show victories in this country and was a successful sire. A number of very fine bitches were also imported durting this period, among them "Jessamine", "Lassie", "Zeal", "Trinket", and "Lena"." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(Sleaford: MacGregor x Nina)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Bow: liver/white, Price's Bang x Davey's Luna)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Faust: Lord Sefton's Sam x Pilkington's Nell)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Jessamine:)
(Lassie: liver/white, w: 1877, Price's Bang x Leache's Belle)
(Zeal: liver/white, w: 1876, Price's Bang x Leache's Belle)
(Trinket:)
(Lena:)




1879 - "Croxteth" Imported

Croxteth, image from Hochwalt, from painting by J.M. Tracy, click to enlarge "Croxteth"
"In 1879 the Rev. J.C. MacDonna came over to America with a young dog named "Croxteth". He was a liver and white pointer, large in size, long in body, strong in bone and muscle and possessing a peculiarly long, lean head. That is, it seemed peculiar to those fanciers who had become accustomed to the rather cloddy Sefton heads, which nearly all of the importations of that day possessed. The arrival of "Croxteth" in this country really marks the first period of pointer improvement as far as field trials are concerned in America, for he was by far the greatest influence on the breed among the many that were brought over up to this time." -- A.F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer; image from Hochwalt, from painting by J.M. Tracy

(liver/white, w: 1878, Lowe's Young Bang x McDonna's Jane)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1879 - National American Kennel Club Inaugural Field Trial - "Bow" Tied for Second

National American Kennel Club Field Trial, click to enlarge "National American Kennel Club Inaugural Field Trial""
National American Kennel Club Inaugural Field Trial, November 24, 1879, Patoka, Illinois.

Bow, from J.M. Tracy, click to enlarge "Bow"

(Bow: liver/white, Price's Bang x Davey's Luna)
[Pedigree, etc.]




ReturnReturn


1880s
1880 - English System of Registration

"It was not until the Kennel Club was founded in 1873 that any thought was given to a registration scheme. In 1880 the newly formed Kennel Club Committee introduced a system of universal registration in order to avoid confusion from repetition of the same name for dogs in the same breed. This system has been in existence ever since." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"

Kennel Club Registry of Names: "COPY OF RULE" -- "Every dog exhibited at a Show held under the Kennel Club Rules must, previous to the time of entry for such show, be entered in a registry of names kept by the Kennel Club at their office, 29A, Pall Mall, London, S.W. A charge of one shilling each dog will be made for registration. A name that has been already assumed and duly registered in the Kennel Club Registry, or entered in any published number of the Kennel Club Calendar and Stud Book, by the owner of a dog of the same breed, cannot be registered unless by a distinguishing name or number. Dogs that are already entered in any published number of the Kennel Club Calendar and Stud Book are exempt from the above Rule, provided their names remain unchanged." -- The Kennel Gazette, July 1880




1881 - "Ch. Graphic" whelped

Graphic, click to enlarge "Ch. Graphic"
"4067. GRAPHIC. Graphic Kennels, Jersey City, NJ. Breeder E. C. Norrish, England. Whelped April 15, 1881; liver and white ticked; by Leach's Bonus-Sancho, out of Furston-Juno, by Huggin's Don Juan, out of Juno VI; Bonus-Sancho by Price's Ch. Bang, out of Leech's Bell." -- VOL III, Sec 1, p. 101 of The American Kennel Stud Book, published quarterly by N. Rowe, dated 1886; reprinted in Pointer Points, vol.4-91"

(w: April 15, 1881, liver/white ticked, Leach's Bonus-Sancho x Furston-Juno)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1882 - First Pointer to win an Important Field Trial - "Vandevort's Don"

Vandevort's Don, click to enlarge "Vandevort's Don"
"The first Pointer to win an important field trial was "Don", owned by R.T. Vandevort. Don won first place ($250 cash) in the Free-For-All stake of the National American Kennel Club's trials, which were run on prairie chickens at Fairmont, Minn., beginning September 4, 1882, eight years after the first field trial was held. In addition to the cash purse, "Vandevort's Don" won the Pennsylvania State Field Trials Association cup for the best dog in the stake owned in Pennsylvania and a special prize of $20 for the best Pointer in the stake." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

1882 - National American Kennel Club, First Trials on Prairie Chickens at Fairmont, Minnesota, September 4, 1882, Judges: Theo. Morfor, D.C. Bergundthal, B. Waters, Monday, afterward E. C. Sterling. Auxiliary Judges: B.F. Wilson, J.H. Dew, J.D. Brown. Free-For-All Stake: Purse, $500., Open to all Setters and Pointers. First prize: $250, second: $125, third: $75, fourth:$50. Entrance $20. 28 entries and starters -- 22 English Setters, 2 Irish, 4 Pointers. 1) "Don", Pointer, liver/white, Sire: Price's Bang, Dam: Peg, Owner: R. T. Vandevort, Handler: owner. 2) "Sue", English Setter, also 2nd: "Dashing Novice", English Setter. 3) "Gertrude, English Setter, also 3rd: "Count Noble", English Setter, and, "Bessie", English Setter. 4) "Biz", Irish Setter, and also 4th: "Prairie Ranger", English Setter. Special Prizes: "R.T. Vandevort's Don" won the Prennsylvania State Field Trials Association Cup for best dog in stake owned in Pennsylvania. "R.T. Vandevort's Don" won the prize of $20 for best Pointer in the Free for All Stake. "J.W. Orth's Gertrude" and "Dr. N. McDonald's Rock" divided special of $50 for best dogs whose handlers had not previously handled a dog in a Field Trial. -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907, Field Trial Record of Dogs in America, 1874-1907

(Vandevort's Don:, liver/white, w: January 1879, Price's Bang x Leatheridge Peg)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1884 - American Kennel Club

"On September 17, 1884, a group of twelve dedicated sportsmen, responding to a "meeting call" from Messrs. J.M. Taylor and Elliot Smith, met in the rooms of the Philadelphia Kennel Club in that City. Each member of the group was a representative or "delegate" from a dog club that had, in the recent past, held a benched dog show or had run field trials. This new "Club of Clubs" was, in fact, The American Kennel Club." -- American Kennel Club Website, August 2000

"The Westminster Kennel Club is elected by the American Kennel Club as the AKC's first member club. The American Fox Terrier Club becomes the next member in 1886. Westminster is the only all breed club to be a member until the Rhode Island Kennel Club joins in 1897." -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, 2009

"Of the 13 clubs who founded the American Kennel Club in 1884, only the Westminster Kennel Club remains." -- American Kennel Club Gazatte, April 2002, vol. 119, no. 4, p. 112




1885 - "Ch. Graphic" imported to U.S.

Graphic, click to enlarge "Ch. Graphic"
"During 1885, Mr. James L. Anthony of New York startled the kennel world by importing the famed English champion "Graphic", and a valuable brood bitch, "Nell of Efford", from Mr. Norrish's kennels in Devonshire. ... "Graphic's" first appearance was at the Pittsburgh show of 1886. Major Taylor judged and when it came to the special for the best pointer he gave it to "Robert le Diable" over "Revel III" and "Graphic"." -- James Watson, "The Dog Book", 1906; reprinted in Pointer Points, vol.4-91"

(Graphic: w: April 15, 1881, liver/white/ticked, Leach's Bonus-Sancho x Furston-Juno)
[Pedigree, etc.]
(Nell of Efford: lemon/white, Don Juan x Rew's Kate)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1885 - Westminster Best Sporting Dog - "Robert Le Diable"

Robert Le Diable, click to enlarge "Robert Le Diable"
""5556 Robert Le Diable" -- Highland Kennels, Red Bank, N.J. Breeder, St. Louis Kennel Club, St. Louis, Mo. Whelped June 12, 1883; liver, white and ticked; by "Champion Croxteth", out of "Spinaway". See tabulated pedigree. Field Trial: -- Winner all-aged Pointer stake, E.F.T. Club, 1886. Bench Shows: -- Special for best Pointer, New York; special for best Sporting Dog, New York, 1885; 1st, St. Louis; 1st, Cincinnati; champion, Pittsburg; champion and special; New York 1886." -- AKC Studbook, 1887, Vol.IV

(Robert Le Diable: w: June 12, 1883, liver/white/ticked, Croxteth x Pilkington's Spinaway)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1888 - Canadian Kennel Club

"By the 1880s, firm interest in pure-bred dogs in Canada was indicated by a proliferation of dog shows held in Saint John, Montreal, Toronto, and London and in Manitoba. With the formation of the American Kennel Club in 1884, these shows were held under AKC rules, and pure-bred dogs were registered with that club. By 1887 it seemed obvious that a national Canadian club was needed and the following year, at a general meeting held at Tecumseh House in London, Ontario, the Canadian Kennel Club was formed. ... The first dog registered was the Club Secretary's winning English Setter, "Forest Fern"." -- Canadian Kennel Club Website, August 2000




1888 - Pointer Club of America

"The answer to whether the Pointer Club of America was a charter member of AKC in 1884, or joined shortly thereafter was found in "The American Book of the Dog", edited by G. O. Shields, 1891. The Pointer chapter, written by Charles K. Westbrook, A.M., states "The organization of a club, in 1888, devoted to his interests and development, is also a move in the right direction; and if the counsel of this body are wisely governed, it can accomplish much in unifying the interests of the breed in America, making the types of breeding more uniform, and securing proper recognition for the Pointer." The 1890 membership included Hon. John S. Wise, president; George W. LaRue, secretary and treasurer; and James L. Anthony, first of four vice-presidents. Its membership list includes most of the prominent Pointer men in the country. Artist Gustav Muss-Arnolt was the Pointer Club of America's first AKC Delegate." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-95


1888 - First Woman Judging in the U.S.

1888 - "With her assignment of 117 St. Bernards at Westminster, Anna Whitney becomes the first woman to judge a dog show in America. She judges every year for the next seven years, but it would be 1901 before another woman judges any dog show in the U.S." -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, 2009




1889 - Canadian Kennel Club Inaugural Field Trials

1889 - The Canadian Kennel Club, Inaugural Trials at Chatham, Canada, November 11, 1889, Judge: John Davidson.
All-Age Stake: For Setters and Pointers, First prize, $75; second $35; third, $15. For best Pointer placed, $10. Entrance, $5 forfeit, $5 additional to start. 20 nominations. 16 starters -- 12 English Setters, 4 Pointers. 1) "Pitti Sing" (Baron Doveridge x Norah), English Setter, liver and white, owner: Thos. Johnson, handler: owner; 2) "Dinah C" (Mingo x Fausta II), English Setter, black and white, owner: W.B. Wells, handler: owner; 3) "Ightfield Blithe" (Dancer x Ightfield Bloom), Pointer, liver and white, owner: Thos. Johnson, handler: Thos. Johnson.
Derby: 7 nominations. 6 starters -- 2 English Setters, 1 Gordon, 3 Pointers. 1) "Ightfield Blithe" (Dancer x Ightfield Bloom), Pointer, liver and white, owner: Thos. Johnson, handler: owner; 2) "Brighton Pride" (Brant x Belle), English Setter, Blue belton, owner: T.G. Davey, handler: owner; 3) "Breezo" (not given x not given), Pointer, liver, owner: R.G. Hervey, handler: J.B. McGregor.
"Pitti Sing won the American Field Cup, "Ightfield Blithe", the prize for best Pointer.
-- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907, Field Trial Record of Dogs in America




1889 - "Rip Rap" - Black and Whites

Rip Rap, image from Hochwalt, from painting by E.H. Osthaus, click to enlarge "Rip Rap"
""Rip Rap" was one of the first white and black Pointers to make a big mark in the field trial world. For many years prior to his appearance, black in a Pointer was frowned upon with suspicion, but it was not long before this prejudice was dispelled. So prominently did his name become associated with the white and blacks that to this day many of those not so well informed as they consider themselves refer to every white and black Pointer as a "Rip Rap". "Rip Rap" sired 19 field trial winners, many of them fine producers. His best son was "Young Rip Rap", a brilliant performer and a successful sire." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951; image from Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer, from painting by E.H. Osthaus

(w: 1889, Ch. King of Kent x Hops)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1889 - "The American Kennel Gazette"

"'The American Kennel Gazette' was first published in January 1889. It was the idea of AKC's fourth president, August Belmont Jr." -- American Kennel Club Gazette, April 2002, vol. 119, no. 4, p. 112




ReturnReturn


1890s
1890 - AKC Field Trials Established

"The American Kennel Club was basically formed for bench shows, but added field trials in 1890." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-95




1891 - First Crufts Show

"Crufts is named after its founder Charles Cruft ... The first Crufts show in that name was booked into the Royal Agricultural Hall, Islington in 1891." -- Crufts Website, August 2000

[Crufts Breed Winners]




1893 - Heavyweights and Lightweights

"Before entering at length into his (a pointer) description it may be as well to state that the classes at the more important shows are arranged to meet his different sizes, for the pointer varies in this respect more than any other sporting dog. Such classification is usually for "large-size" dogs 55 lb. weight and over, and bitches 50 lb. weight and over; the "small size" including dogs under 55 lb. weight, and bitches under 50 lb. weight." -- Rawdon B. Lee, 1893, A History and Description of the Modern Dogs (Sporting Division) of Great Britain and Ireland




1893 - Rosettes at Westminster

"It's getting to be a 'moral' that any undertaking of the Westminster Kennel Club means a certain success -- nay! a 'howling' success -- and surely the club's show last month at Madison Square Garden scored a triumph. A grandeur lot of high-bred canines were perhaps never gathered under one roof, and from the 'fancy' to the 'four hundred,' all united in the decision that it was an extraordinarily good show and admirably managed. FOr seventeen years the club has held regular annual shows, and it must be extremely gratifying to all concerned that the seventeenth fixture proved the best of all the long series. Unfortunately the weather was about as unfavorable as it could well be, and the attendance was not quite up to last year's record, though enough to leave a handsome cash balance to the good. Never was show better managed -- but, then, Mr. James Mortimer was, as usual, superintendent, which explains everything. The sanitary arrangements were excellent, and the benching and feeding, by Spratts' Patent, allowed of no criticism. The handsome catalogue was good indeed, and the innovation in the matter of neat rosettes in lieu of diplomas seemed to give general satifaction. ... -- Outing, March 1893, p.15
[MORE Westminster Kennel Club winners and information]




1896 - First National Bird Dog Championship

"The first National Bird Dog Championship was won by the Setter (English), "Count Gladstone IV" in 1896. Each succeeding year found a Setter at the top of the class ... until 1909, when the Pointer "Manitoba Rap" gained the crown." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

"Most important of all bird dog field trials is, of course, the National Bird Dog Championship. With heats of 3 hours duration, this is an endurance stake. Its standards are of the highest. Not only must the winner be able to go the long route at rapid pace but he must also handle to the gun. Whenever a dog wins this greatest of all bird-dog titles one can rest assured that here is a dog that is capable of providing a thrilling day of gunning." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

1896 - National Championship Association Club, West Point, Mississippi, February 10-12, 1896, Judges: A. Merriman, J.D. King, and W.S. Bell, For Champion Cup: Open to Setters and Pointers that have been placed in any public field trials, 13 Nominations, 11 Starters. First: "Count Gladstone IV", English Setter, "Count Noble" x "Ruby's Girl", owner: Avent & Hitchcock, handler: J. M. Avent. -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907, Field Trial Record of Dogs in America

"The National Championship was first organized and run near West Point, Mississippi in 1896. Later, the competition was conducted on field trial grounds south of Grand Junction, Tennessee; near Rogers Springs, Tennessee; and finally, the Ames Plantation, north of Grand Junction and LaGrange, Tennessee. The National found a permanent home on the Ames Plantation in 1915 and each running since has been on the "hallowed" field trial grounds set in place by Hobart Ames, long time President and Judge of the National Championship. Running on some 6,000 acres of Ames Plantation is now conducted each year beginning on the second or third Monday in February with a usual entry of about 36 English Pointers and /or English Setters, winners or placers in 70 qualifying trials throughout the U.S. and Canada, competing. To be ideally executed, this event requires good populations of native bobwhite quail in an all-age field trial habitat. Several thousand field trial aficionados from all over the world attend the event each year." -- Ames Plantation Website, 2002

"James Monroe Avent (1860-1936), along with Hobart Ames, was responsible for establishing the National Bird Dog Championship in Hardeman County. The bird dog trials continue to be held annually at the Ames Plantation in Grand Junction. Avent’s house in Hickory Valley was listed in the National Register on April 25, 2001, because of his role in starting and promoting the bird dog trials. Both Avent and some of the dogs he trained were notable enough to be placed in the Field Trial Hall of Fame. The house is also significant because it is a fine example of the popular Queen Anne style. A variety of sawn and turned woodwork embellishes the house." -- Tennessee Historical Commission Website, 2002, National Register of Historic Places

[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1897 - Second National Bird Dog Championship - "Declared Off"

1897 - National Champion Field Trial Association, West Point, Mississippi, January 26, 1897, 5 Entries: "Marie's Sport", "Delhi", "Harold Skimpole", "Minnie T.", and "Tony Boy", declared off. Entrance money refunded. Thermometer 17 degrees above zero. -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907, Field Trial Record of Dogs in America

[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1898 - "Faskally Bragg", Henry Sawtell, and an early "Recreational Vehicle"

Faskally Bragg, click to enlarge "Faskally Bragg"
"In 1898 the celebrated pointer "Fascally Brag" was born. He became both a field trial champion and a bench champion. Today he would claim the title of dual champion. His breeder and owner was Henry Sawtell. This gentleman had a 4,500-acre shoot in Wiltshire. He had a portable shooting box known as Bohemian. It was really a well-appointed caravan built at the cost of 1,000 Pounds for the Duke of Newcastle, but purchased by Mr. Sawtell. It was fitted with kitchen, cooking range, dark room, gun room, sleeping accommodation for four, a piano and a wine locker. He would place this caravan on St. Ann's Hill -- the highest point in Wiltshire -- in the very center of his shoot. "Fascally Brag" was a prolific sire of outstanding stock for show or work." -- Edmondson & Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer

(w: 1898, Rock of Stockhill x Fleece of Bromfield)
[Pedigree, etc.]




ReturnReturn


1900s
1900 - Turn of the Century - "Lunesdale", "Arkwright", "Mallwyd", "Ferndale"

"When the century dawned, with Victoria in the 63rd year of her reign, and the horse still mightier than the internal-combustion engine and whisky 15/- a gallon, the Lunesdale kennel of Mr. and Mrs. Horner, the kennel of Mr. Wm. Arkwright, the "Mallwyds" of Mr. Tom Steadman, were powers in the land. It is their strains, along with the "Ferndales" of the late Mr. Dan Davies, that have played the biggest part in passing on the qualities of that day to the qualities of this one." -- Lola Macdonald Daly, The Pointer as a Showdog"




1900s - "Crossing for Coon Dogs"

"My experience has been that the crossing of an English pointer dog and American fox hound slut for 'coon dogs, are the best I ever saw, writes an Ohio night hunter of rare judgement and experience, and I will illustrate by relating the accomplishments of a certain dog of the breeding. I will say further that the sire of this dog I mention was the most remarkable I ever heard of -- a fine large pointer, and often when hunting quails or pheasants in the woods he would bark up and had done it many times before they found out the cause. One day while hunting pheasants he began to bark up a hollow beech stub, and when called, refused to leave his post, and his hair was slightly raised, which excited the hunter's curiosity and they procured an axe and felled the stub. To their surprise, two large 'coons came rolling out and were dispatched. This solved the problem, and after that, he was the cause of many 'coons losing their life, as he located them in the den and trees where they had not stepped a foot on the ground. I for one can surely recommend this cross to make good 'coon dogs." -- Oliver Hartley, 1909, "Hunting Dogs": A.R. Harding, Publishers, Columbus, Ohio




1900s - "For Sale - $1.00"

"There are a great many worthless dogs, but the dogs are not to blame. I am writing on fox dogs, but it holds good on all dogs. There is always a worthless bitch, and sometimes several of them to be had for nothing, and some fellow who wants a dog but don't want to pay a fair price says, 'I'll get that bitch and breed her to that dog down at Graysville. They say he's a crackerjack, and I'll get some good dogs and they won't cost me anything either'. Well, when the time comes to breed it's five miles to Graysville, and the roads are awful muddy, and he concluded to breed to Jim Jones' dog just over the way, saying he ain't much of a dog, and a cousin to the bitch, but his great-grandmother got more foxes than any dog over in these parts, and some of the pups will breed back. He gets eight or ten pups, which he gets perhaps $1.00 a piece for, and it costs just as much to raise a poor one as a good one. The owners spend a lot of time trying to make dogs of them and have nothing at last." -- Oliver Hartley, 1909, "Hunting Dogs": A.R. Harding, Publishers, Columbus, Ohio




1900s - Early AKC Championships

"Early American shows followed precedents set in England with respect to the championship title and required three first place wins in the Open Class, which was generally divided by sex. Several changes were made in 1900, and a point scale emerged, based on the total number of dogs at the show; ranging from one point at all-breed shows with under 250 dogs, to the five point maximum at all-breed shows with 1000 dogs and over entered. The number of dogs in each breed was not considered. This schedule had obvious inequities. In all instances, regardless of show or entry, an accumulation of ten points was required for the title of champion. All member club specialty shows were rated at four points, while non-member specialties were given a two point rating, regardless of the size of entry. ... On January 10, 1910 new Rules Governing Dog Shows eliminated the Graduate Class; substituted an American-Bred Class, and changed the prerequisite for a championship title, requiring fifteen points, under three different judges, three points having to be won at one show." -- AKC Website, 2002




1900 - Pointer Club of America's Inaugural Field Trial

"The Pointer Club of America held its inaugural field trial at Jamesport, Long Island, NY, November 14, 1900. There were 6 nominations, 4 starters in the Members' Derby; 4 starters in the Members' Stake and 7 starters in the All-Age Stake. In 1901 a Champion Stake open to all was added; in 1902 a Free-For-All Stake drew 10 nominations, 8 starters. 1903 was cancelled at Homdel, NJ due to scarcity of quail. The field trial in 1904 was held December 12, at Barber Junction, NC, and judged by John White and Gustav Muss-Arnolt. It featured an Open Derby, All-Age Stake, Free-For-Al Stake and the Pointer Club's Stake. 1905's judges were Major J. M. Taylor and G. Muss-Arnolt, and "Alford's King", son of "F. Ch. Alford's John", won the Open Derby and All-Age Stake at Barber Junction, NC." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", quoting Major J. M. Taylor's 'Field Trial Record of Dogs in America 1874-1907', Pointer Points, vol.3-95

1900 - Pointer Club of America, Inaugural Trials, Jamesport, Long Island, N.Y., November 14, 1900
Member's Derby (6 nominations, 4 starters): 1) "Merry Girl" (Teddy B x King's Daughter), owner: H.W. Terry, handler: owner; 2) "Bess Jingo" (Lad of Jingo x Blacksie), owner: Dr. C.E. Ellis, handler: Geo. Battison; 3) "Black Jingo" (Lad of Jingo x Blacksie), owner: Dr. C.E. Ellis, handler: Geo. Battison.
Member's Stake (4 starters): 1) "Mott's Fred" (Prince's Lad x Leah II), owner: Geo. S. Mott; 2) "John of Kent" (Beaufort of Kent x Bloom of Kent), owner: W. C. Root, handler: owner; 3) "Black Sensation" (Young Rip Rap x Lady Margaret), owner: Geo. S. Mott, handler: owner.
All-Age Stake (7 starters): 1) "Mott's Fred" (Prince's Lad x Leah II), owner: Geo. S. Mott, handler: Geo. S. Mott; 2) "Gypsie Dexter" (Duke of Dexter x Lola Queen), owner: Dr. C. E. Ellis, handler: Geo. Battison; 3) "Fred" (Tim of Kent x Miss Fred), owner: W. Ferguson, Jr., handler: Geo. S. Mott. -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907, Field Trial Record of Dogs in America




1901 - "F.Ch. Alford's John" whelped

Alford's John, click to enlarge "F.Ch. Alford's John"
"What the "four aces" were to the Pointers of the early days, what "Croxteth" and "King of Kent" were to a later period, and what "Rip Rap" and "Jingo" were still later, "Alford's John" and "Fishel's Frank" were in the period following the turn of the century. Their advent marked the real rise of the Pointer in field trial competitions. The blood of these two great bird dogs, more than that of any others, brought the Pointer up to a basis of even competition with his long-haired rival, the English Setter." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

""Alford's John" is a handsome white and liver dog, with quite a good head and a clean neck going into excellent shoulders, but his running gear is what strikes the fancy of the practical field trial man, for it is powerful and muscular, and built on lines that denote the workman. He has been shown in the field trial classes at various shows, and usually gave a good account of himself, having been placed first at Detroit over "Alpine Lad" at the show held there in 1906. His only fault from the bench show point of view is that he lacks depth of chest; yet he is well ribbed up and has abundant heart and lung room; this, with his strong loin and quarter, is what gives him that marvelous staying power which he possesses." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points vol.1-90, quoting F. Freeman Lloyd, DOG LOVERS, October 1907, who in turn is quoting A. F. Hochwalt

(w: January 12, 1901, liver/white, Dave Kent x Cleade)
[Pedigree, etc.]


1904 - First Wearing of Armbands at Westminster

1904 - "For the first time, handlers wear arm bands with the catalog number of their dog." -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, 2009




1905 - Groups at Westminster

The idea of "Groups" appeared at the Westminster Kennel Club show in 1905.

"There is a total entry of 2,701 for the show of the Westmisnter Kennel Club, on Feb. 13 to 16, which is larger than in any previous year. The oddity classes, which are for the breeds newly admitted to registration, such as the Pekinese spaniels, Griffons Bruxellois, Chihuahuas and Russian sheepdogs, have all filled well and also the variety classs, which are for dogs of all breeds under entirely new conditions. These classes are to be a spectacular feature as well as of interest to the breeders. The first will bring into the ring the dogs that have won the title of champion in all breeds at the show, who will be placed for the four awards of $25, $15, $10, and $5. This will bring into rivalry big dogs and little ones; fighters, hunting dogs and sprinters, the best of the lot receiving the awards. There is a similar class for champion bitches, and for the winners in the open and novice class. There is a class of the sort for the winning toys and the remaining novelty classes are the breeders' class and team and brace prizes. ..." Pointer Entry: 81. -- The Sun (New York, N.Y.), February 5, 1905

[MORE Westminster Kennel Club winners and information]




1906 - "The Pointer and His Predecessors"

"Any reader who is interested in the early history of pointers would be well-advised to read William Arkwright's great classic, written at the turn of the century. It is entitled The Pointer and His Predecessors and it deals very ably and in great detail with the evolution of the pointer." -- Edmondson & Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer

"Mr. Arkwright is an enthusiast, otherwise it would have been impossible for him to write this book about the Pointer and its ancestors. ... It is a thorough work well worthy of the nine years the author has spent upon it." -- Arkwright, 1906, The Pointer and His Predicessors, quote from "The Times"


1907 - First Westminster Kennel Club Best-in-show

The award of Best In Show was given for the first time at Westminster. It was awarded to "Ch. Warren Remedy", a Smooth Fox Terrier (who also won in 1908 and 1909, a feat which has never been duplicated at Westminster). A panel of 10 judges made the decision. -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, 2009

[MORE Westminster Kennel Club winners and information]




1908 - "Fishel's Frank" lost the National Championship

Fishel's Frank, click to enlarge "Fishel's Frank"
"Three years after "Alford's John" made his first appearance, U.R. Fishel, Hope, Indiana, brought out a youngster named "Fishel's Frank", and won second with him in the Nebraska Derby. Frank ... soon attracted much attention by his spectacular performances and it was not long before breeders were flocking to his banner. He won on many occasions, but the race which brought him more fame than any was a race he lost. This was the National Championship of 1908. "Count Whitestone II" won, but for months afterwards the field trial gallery buzzed with argument that "Fishel's Frank" should have been the new champion. And the dog's fame continued to spread. After this race he was retired to the stud." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(Fishel's Rip Rap x Boy's Queen)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1909 - First National Champion - "National Field Trial Champion Manitoba Rap"

Manitoba Rap, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. Manitoba Rap"
"The first Pointer to win the National Championship was "Manitoba Rap", whose bloodlines combined those of "Rip Rap", "Jingo", and "Rush of Lad". He was retired from competition immediately after winning the championship in 1909, when he was still less than three years of age." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

"After a number of years of retirement Mr. Dickey started him ("Alford's John") in the National Championship at Grand Juction, Tenn., in 1909. At this time he was in his ninth year and he surprised the field trial contingent with the race that he put up, for he was game to the core and ran strong to the finish. ... His brace-mate was the young dog, "Manitoba Rap", then less than three years of age. ... The oldest and the youngest in the stake were down together to compete for the greatest honor the field trial world has to bestow. "Manitoba Rap" won it, but "Alford's John" ran a heat that was the talk of the followers." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points vol.1-90"

(liver/white, w: April 4, 1906, Gorham's Ripple x Lady Cyrano Rush)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




ReturnReturn


1910s
1910s - "Comanche Frank" and "John Proctor"

""Fishel's Frank" sired 58 field trial winners, many of them champions and top-flight performers. ... Two of his sons made Pointer history. They were "Comanche Frank" and "John Proctor", both out of daughters of "Alford's John"". ... Both won the National Championships ("Comanche Frank" in 1914 and "John Proctor" in 1916) in addition to other field trial title events. Both established winning and producing families which have made and are continuing to make Pointer history." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(Fishels Frank: w: 1908, Fishel's Rip Rap x Boy's Queen)
[Pedigree, etc.]

Fishel's Frank and Comanche Frank, click to enlarge "Fishel's Frank" and "Comanche Frank"
""Comanche Frank" was the sire of the sensational "Mary Montrose", winner of the National Championship when still a derby and the first dog to win this title three times. When she was right, "Peerless Mary", as she was called, was parctically unbeatable." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(1914 Nat.F.Ch. Comanche Frank: w: 1908, Fishel's Frank x Lady John)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]


John Proctor, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. John Proctor"
"John Proctor", whose dam was "Miss Mariutch", another daughter of "Alford's John", won four championships, including the National Championship of 1916. In all he had 23 wins, 14 of them being first places, and left a long list of winning progeny, 47 in all." -- The Sportsman's Bookshelf, Volume XIII, Hunting Dogs and Their Uses: The Stackpole Company, Harrisburg, PA, 1951

(1916 Nat.F.Ch. John Proctor: w: 1910, Fishel's Frank x Miss Mariutch)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1911 - "Specials" Classes in AKC

"In 1911 ... definite rules for classified and unclassified "special" prizes were established. A classified special prize was one offered in a single breed, somewhat similar to an award for best of breed (although the AKC did not record such a win). An unclassified special was a prize offered in classes involving multiple-breed competition similar to the present groups and best in show. Competition for this prize was by representatives of several breeds in a single class. "Special" prizes were offered at most shows; dogs could be entered for "Specials only" and this practice is the origin of our present day use of the word referring to champions as "Specials", or "Specialing" a dog." -- AKC Website, 2002




1917 - Superintendents and Judges Licenced

"Superintendents and judges were first licensed in 1917." -- American Kennel Club Gazette, April 2002, vol. 119, no. 4, p. 112




1917 - "Nat.F.Ch. Mary Montrose" took Winners Bitch at Westminster

Mary Montrose, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. Mary Montrose"
"She came to the 1917 Westminster show fresh from her victory in the National Championship at Grand Junction, with coat cut up with briers and the hard going of the field, but she was like whipcord --- and she won. Won not only her own sphere, the field trial class, but took winners and thus acquired the distinction of being crowned the best pointer bitch in the show!" -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points vol.3-90

(w: January 2, 1915, Nat. F. Ch. Comanche Frank x Lorna Doone)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Winners]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




England Before the "Great War"

"Great days these were. Shall we of this generation, I wonder, ever see a Cruft's like the one which had no fewer than five full-champions entered -- "Ch. Rumney Refrain", "Ch. Lune Monarch", "Ch. Lunesdale George", "Ch. Lunesdale Maud", and "Ch. Mallwyd Kathleen"? The late Mr. Herbert C. Hignett, once asked which, in his opinion, was the best Pointer during the ten years previous the the War, replied: 'That query is unanswerable; there never was a best ever.' But he named a few which, he said, if living could hold their own with the best of modern times. They were, in dogs, "Ch. Lunesdale George", "Ch. Lune Monarch", "Ch. Lunesdale Wagg", "Ch. Lurgan Loyalty", "Ch. Steady Tom", and "Young Saddleback"; in bitches, "Ch. Coronation", "Ch. Rumney Refrain", and "Ch. Lunesdale Maud". He thus included four of the five title-owners shown at that notable Crufts." -- Lola Macdonald Daly, The Pointer as a Showdog"




Decline in Field, Increase in Show, The "Professional" Dog Show Judge

"Every development reaches its zenith where it either remains or declines. The decline can go to full disappearance. This happened with the Point in Britain. There was a decline already noticeable during the last years before the First World War when the old guard started to fade away. Only a few clung to the principle to breed the Pointer, and for that matter all British bird dogs as superlative field specialists. The decline gained mommentum after the 1914-18 war when many found breeding topclass field dogs too expensive. Many changed to the easier and cheaper way to breed dogs for show purposes. The number of dog shows increased from year to year and this lured many of the younger generation. This finally split the breed into working and show dogs. Breeding show-dogs became frequently a business proposition, and supported by the excellent feeding-stuff industry, litters of well boned Pointers or Setters came into the world. Many of these breeders lacked the tuition and experience regarding the correct type, and many of the new show judges were neither in a position to recognize or demand the correct type. A new, up to then unknown profession had emerged -- the professional show judge who advertises his services and frequently states his price." -- W. Maar, Pointers and Setters




ReturnReturn


1920s
1920 - "Nat. F. Ch. Mary Montrose" won her third National Championship

Mary Montrose, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. Mary Montrose"
""Triple National Champion Mary Montrose" glorified the descriptive adjective. The more demonstrative the description, the better she wore it. Words like stunning, spectacular, extraordinary, brilliant, immortal, amazing, courageous ..... draped her achievements like silk and framed her record in gold. "Peerless Mary" was the pointer equivalent of "Secretariat", a magnificent looking, splendid athlete of uncommon intelligence and charisma." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points vol.1-91

(w: January 2, 1915, Nat. F. Ch. Comanche Frank x Lorne Doone)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1920 - First AKC Sanctioned Matches

"In 1920, sanctioned matches were begun. They provided useful training exercises for more formal events and they made dog owners more aware of correct show procedures." -- American Kennel Club Website, August 2000




1924 - AKC "Best-In-Show" Began

"In 1923, AKC barred interbreed competition except in the Miscellaneous Class. Comprehensive new rules for Groups and Best In Show judging were adopted effective 1924. Under the new rules and judging procedures adopted at that time, all breeds (except for those in Miscellaneous Competition) were separated into five groups: Group 1 - Sporting Dogs, which included at that time all Hound breeds; Group 2 - Working Dogs; Group 3 - Terriers; Group 4 - Toy Breeds; and Group 5 - Non-Sporting Breeds. These Best of Breed winners in each group were then judged together to determine the best dog in that group and, finally, the five group winners met to decide the best dog in the show. By 1924, the new group alignment was in general use. The Westminster Kennel Club was the first to include judging for Best In Show under the new format. Later in the 1920s, the groups were expanded to six, as Hounds became separate group. " -- American Kennel Club Website, August 2000

"The AKC separated the breeds into five groups and inaugurated official group and Best in Show judging in 1924; in that year Westminster was the first club to offer these classes. The first Westminster BIS was Sealyham Terrier Ch. Barberry Hill Bootlegger. The five groups were Sporting (including hounds), Working, Terrier, Toy, and Non-Sporting." -- American Kennel Club Gazette, April 2002, v. 119, no. 4, p. 112




1925 - "Nat.F.Ch. Becky Broom Hill" won her third National Championship

Nat.F.Ch. Becky Broom Hill, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. Becky Broom Hill"
""Becky Broom Hill" had her moments. She did not have the lofty air and grand style of "Mary Montrose", but at times performed faultlessly and in a manner that won her deserved fame. Becky's winning record is extensive and all of the victories were scored in major competition. At the time of her retirement by her owner, Louis Lee Haggin of Mount Brilliant Farms, Lexington, Ky., "Becky Broom Hill" had achieved the then unparalleled record of thirty-four wins!" -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points vol.1-91

(Broom Hill Dan x Nell's Queen Cott)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1925 - Crufts

"Cruft's show, with its ample provision for the young idea, has seen the first steps to greatness of many Pointer notabilities, and that of 1925 was a particularly far-reaching event, inasmuch as among the young stock judged by Mr. Tom Steadman that day were "Ferndale Faro" (which won the puppy class, and which appears in the lineage of so many of the present-day dogs through either his son "Marlais Marksman" or his daughter, "Ch. Slades Sylvia"); "Nancolleth Mark", which went through five classes to win his first C.C.; and "Stylish Mac", which was to make his mark as a sire in this country, with "Stylish Monniegold" the most famous of his progeny, and afterwards to influence the breed considerably in the States through the "Herewithem" line of Mr. R.F. Maloney. Mr. Gothard won the bitch certificate on that occasion with a sister to "Mallwyd Mick" in "Mallwyd Mischief"." -- Lola Macdonald Daly, The Pointer as a Showdog"

[Crufts Breed Winners]




1925 - Westminster Best-in-Show - "Int. Ch. Governor Moscow"

Image, Governor Moscow, 1925, click to enlarge "Int'l Ch. Governor Moscow"
"The first pointer to win Best in Show at Westminster, 1925. His sire was from England and his dam was American bred from "F. Ch. Alford's John" lines. He was the beginning of a golden age of show pointers in America, surpassing even the heyday of the 1880s through 1910. He excelled as a shooting dog and sired 9 champions which were as comfortable afield as on the bench. Owned by Robert F. Maloney." ... "Int. Ch. Governor Moscow" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1974. Image caption reads: "Governor Moscow, Pointer, winner at the Westminster Kennel Club show over the largest field of any show." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-92, and American Pointer Club Website, 2000. Image from Nature Magazine, June 1925, photo by Kadel and Herbert. Click image to enlarge.

(Mallwyd Moscow x Queen Mason)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1926 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Nancolleth Belle"

(Sancho x Callington Belle)
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1927 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Dapple Joe"

(lemon/white, John Proctor II x Birdy Bess)
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1927 - "Nat.F.Ch. McTyre"

N.F.Ch. McTyre, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. McTyre"

(F.Ch. Milligan's Dan x McPherson's Choice)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1928 - Crufts RBIS and Best Gundog - "Stainton Spruce"

(Mallwyd Mick x Stainton Society)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]




1858-1928 - "Edmund H. Osthaus"

"Wholesome sport, of all forms pertaining to field and stream, appeal favorably to the consideration of the famous artist, "Edmund H. Osthaus", of Toledo, Ohio. As an angler he is skilful, and takes much genuine pleasure with rod and reel; but his sport with dog and gun transcend all others. ... His kennel contains both well-bred setters and pointers, and he exacts, as a pre-requisite for favorable consideration, that they shall be of special excellence as field performers. These he keeps for his own private shooting and for the friends who are favored with an invitation to join him therin; for he is generous in sharing his peasures. The most famous of his kennel was "Ripsey", a descendant of the great pointer dog, "Rip Rap". She was an excellent field performer and also was a winner several times in the Members Stake of the Eastern Field Trial Club, a condition of the competition being that the dogs shall be handled by owners, hence it is strictly an amateur event. ... Having a profound knowledge of field and field-trial work, combined with high ideals and moral courage to fearlessly declare his judgements, he is much sought, by field-trial clubs, to act as judge at their competitions." -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907

"To the world at large he is best known as a painter of hunting scenes. He most sensibly and beautifully protrays the interesting themes of dog and gun and of fox hunting. His portraits of dogs are marvels of fidelity to truth. He is proficient equally in painting landscapes, cattle, horses, etc., but his specialty is of sport afield. Among his patrons are numbered the most fastidious connoisseurs. Many of his pictures adorn the homes of distinguished patrons in New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago and many other of the world's great cities." -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907

"He was born in Hildesheim, Germany, on August 5, 1858. His father was a gentleman farmer. His mother was an English woman of great beauty and personal charm. ... His artistic temperament early found expression in attempts to sketch the sheep in the pastures, and the deer and other wild animals which wandered from the neighboring forests. As in nearly all such youthful proclivity to the artistic associations of life, this penchant was disapproved by his father, who desired that his son should study architecture. After much importunity his father gave reluctant consent to a six months trial of him at the Art Academy in Dusseldorf. He acquited himself with such pronounced success that his father permitted him to take the entire course. Later his parents journeyed to the United States, where they thereafter made their home. After completing his studies at Dusseldorf, he entered the Atalier of Mr. Christian Kroner, a renowned painter of wild animals and forest scenery. Later he rejoined his parents in the United States." -- Maj. J.M. Taylor, 1907




ReturnReturn


1930s
1930s - Influential - Good or Bad ? - "Ch. Marlais Marksman"

Image, Marlais Marksman, click to enlarge "Marlais Marksman"
"With the coming of the 1930s a new pointer came on the scene -- "Marlais Marksman". He probably had the most influence on the breed in that decade, but many pointer breeders were not sure whether it was for the good. David Steadman probably did more than anyone else to 'make' Marksman into a stud dog as he bred all his early winners by him. They were "Maesydd Mystic", "Pennine Prima Donna", "Pennine Paramount", and "Carswell Septimus". According to one school of thought, "Marksman" was too houndy, and he certainly had a 'down' face. ... Whatever people's opinions were, however, there is no doubt that "Marlais Marksman's" progeny made an impact on the breed." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"

(Ferndale Faro x Fancy Me)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1931 - Crufts RBIS - "Ch. Nancolleth Markable"
1932 - Westminster BIS - "Ch. Nancolleth Markable"

Nancolleth Markable, Fall Photo, click to enlarge "Nancolleth Markable"
"A dog of the 1930s who was never beaten by any other pointer was the lemon and white "Nancolleth Markable". Bred by Mrs. F.A. Rowe, he qualified in the field at the Devon and Cornwall trials before being finally exported to America." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London -- Image: Fall Photo

(lemon/white, Nancolleth Mark x Ella of Crombie)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1932 - Junior Show Classes

"The first Children's Handling class was held at Westbury Kennel Club, September 1932. The program's name was changed to Junior Handling in 1950." -- American Kennel Club Gazette, April 2002, vol. 119, no. 4, p. 112




1934 - 1936 - First AKC Obedience Trials

"Helene Whitehouse Walker was the guiding force behind obedience tests. The first was given at the North Westchester Kennel Club show on June 9, 1934." -- American Kennel Club Gazette, April 2002, vol. 119, no. 4, p. 112

"In the mid 30s, Helene Whitehouse Walker was instrumental in establishing obedience tests. She submitted a pamphlet of procedures to the AKC in December 1935, and three months later the Board of Directors approved it in principle. In April 1936, AKC published the first official "Regulations and Standard for Obedience Test Field Trials". " -- AKC Website, August 2000




1934 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Benson of Crombie"

Benson of Crombie, click to enlarge "Ch. Benson of Crombie"

(liver/white, Ben of Crombie x Ferndale Charlotte)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1935 - "Sensation" and the Westminster Logo

Sensation, click to enlarge "Westminster's Sensation"
"A handsome lemon and white dog, with a fine head and especially good body, "Sensation" did much for Pointer breeders in this country. Several artists did pictures of him and one of the head studies appeared on the Westminster catalog in 1878, the second all-breed show given by the club. Except for a gap between 1896 and 1903, "Sensation's" head appeared on all subsequent catalogues of the Westminster Show through 1935. In 1935, a steel engraving of "Sensation" was discovered in the collection of prints, engravings and paintings of the well-known sportsman, Harry D. Kirkover, of Camden, South Carolina and New York. He loaned the picture to the Westminster Club to permit its reproduction. The engraving, by artist J. Wellstood, showed the whole dog, with a light lemon patch on its side, frozen in point. The artist had caught the magnificently bodied dog in marvelous detail. The muscles and even the veins of the legs stood out. This became the new emblem of the club and appeared on the cover of the show catalog from 1936 through 1979. From 1980-1982, a head study of Sensation was selected once again for the cover, but in 1983 an foil embossed version of the full body engraving appeared on the cover and has been there ever since." -- Image and information courtesy Westminster Kennel Club Website, 2006

(w: February 1874, lemon/white, Price's Jim x Humphrey's Nell)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1935 - Crufts Best-in-Show - "Pennine Prima Donna"

Pennine Prima Donna, Fall Photo, click to enlarge "Pennine Prima Donna"
""Pennine Prima Donna", which making her debut ... was immediately hailed by the judge, Major Harry Gunn, as a smasher of smashers, and from then on her career was the story of one magnificent triumph after another. She won over a score of challenge certificates. She was never beaten by any Pointer in Britain. And with her Mr. Arthur Eggleston won what was perhaps the greatest honour ever to come the way of a Pointer in this country -- best all breeds at Cruft's in 1935. Before that she had been best all breeds at other championship shows in Blackpool, Darlington, and Leeds. Though her career in America, to which she departed after her Cruft's success, was not one of simliar unchallenged supremacy, principally because at the time there appeared to be decided differences in the type preferences of American and British judging, she yet became a champion there. She died, in the late part of 1938, after returning to England, to the kennel of her old owner at Appleby." -- Lola Macdonald Daly, The Pointer as a Showdog" -- Image: Fall Photo

(bitch, l/w, w: 1931, Ch. Marlais Marksman x Maesydd Megan)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]




1935 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Nancolleth Marquis"

Nancolleth Marquis, click to enlarge "Ch. Nancollet Marquis"

(liver/white, Futurist x Ella of Crombie)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1936 - Elhew Kennels

"Elhew Kennels - Breeding English Pointers Since 1936" -- Elhew Kennels Website, September 2000

"Bob Wehle ... has aimed at the same target: improving the breed. He has made this his life's work since 1936, when he mated a lovely Scottish import, "Gem of Fearn", to an impressive shooting dog named "Frank of Sunnylawn". Wehle was only 16 at the time, but (like his pointers) he was uncommonly precocious and determined. Even then he wasn't interested in merely creating replicas of the sire and dam. Rather, he wanted to preserve their outstanding qualities, combine their strengths, and prduce puppies that were, on balance, just a little bit better. And he did. The bitch puppy he kept from the Frank-Gem litter proved to be everything he'd hoped for: smart as a whip, stylish, biddable and eager to please, a bird-finder deluxe. Moreover -- and this is the important part -- she passed these sterling traits to her offspring. Reversing the spelling of his last name, Wehle registered her as "Elhew Midge". She was the first: the foundation dam of a line of Pointers that would become the acknowledged standard of excellence -- the Purdey, the Lafite-Rothschild, the Lamborghini of bird dogs." -- Tom Davis, AKC Gazette, May 1966, vol. 113, no. 5




1936 - "Ch. Nancolleth Beryl of Giralda" - a BIS Record to last for 48 years"

"Ch. Nancolleth Beryl of Giralda" set an "All-Time" Best-In-Show record of 21 BIS, which lasted for 48 years. It was surpassed by "Ch. Cumbrian Black Pearl" in 1984. -- information courtesy Nancy Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels

(liver/white, Nancolleth Mark x Ella of Crombie)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1938 - "Int. Ch. Drumgannon Dreadnought" imported to U.S.

"Imported from England by Paul Palmer in 1938, this handsome liver and white dog won Best in Shows on both sides of the Atlantic before siring 19 American champions." ... "Int. Ch. Drumgannon Dreadnought" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1974. -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-92, and American Pointer Club Website, 2000

(liver/white, Drumgannon Drum Major x Molly of Drumgannon)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1938 - American Pointer Club

"On June 14, 1938, the American Pointer Club was elected to membership in the American Kennel Club. The club's first AKC show was held in conjunction with the Morris and Essex Kennel Club show on May 27, 1939. The first slate of officers was ... President, vacant; First Vice-President Paul Palmer, Second Vice-President Leo A. Dunn; Third Vice-President Mrs. G. P. Strelinger; Fourth Vice-President Edward G. Neale; Secretary-Treasurer-Delegate Dr. George D. Blair." -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-95

[National Specialty Winners]




1939 - "Ch. Pennine Paramount of Prune's Own" - First National Specialty Winner

Pennine Paramount of Prune's Own, click to enlarge "Int'l Ch. Pennine Paramount of Prune's Own"

(lemon/white, w: 1935, Ch. Marlais Marksman x Miss Darkie)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Specialty Winners]




1939 - "Spot Cash Comanche II, CD" - First (?) Obedience Titled Pointer

The first (?) Obedience Titled Pointer -- information assumed from Pata, Pointer Champions 1889-1980, listed as "not registered, 1939", and Pata, unpublished information




World War II

"At the beginning of the Second World War the Kennel Club immediately ruled that all championship shows and big open shows should cease. Pointer breeding for a short time halted entirely. The main question was, would we be able to feed our dogs with the food restrictions which would be sure to come, and what about the expected bombing? Among the many thousands of dogs which were put to sleep at the commencement of hostilities were a great many pointers. Gradually, however, people began to adjust themselves. Many pointer owners served with the armed forces and others were on wartime work, but their dogs were in many cases retained and cared for by wives or families. For instance, the owners of the Pennine and Bellaport, Arthur Eggleston and Jack Knowles, both served, and whilst on active service planned matings for their stock." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London"




ReturnReturn


1940s
First Post-War Champion (England) - "Ch. Highflier of Ide"

"The Kennel Club ruled that the wartime shows should be organized on a twenty-five-mile radius basis. Certain breeders had the advantage of being able to show practically every week, whilst other people, depending upon their geographical location, were lucky if they could attend two shows in a year. So it was that various circuits formed themselves -- the Midland circuit, the Yorkshire-Lancashire border circuit, etc. In these circuits it was possible for a dog to be shown week by week at all the small shows which were usually held in aid of the Red Cross or similar causes. The pointer flag was kept flying in this restricted, but sometimes extremely hot, competition. Pointers were particularly strong in the Yorkshire-Lancashire border country. ... In Yorkshire, Louis Feather's "Valentine of Highmeade", T. Lambert's "Carmelite", "Dalesman", and "Cravendale Crofter" were foremost in the battle, along with "Cravendale Cara", owned by W. E. Edmondson, and later her son, "Forest Fleet", who became "Ch. Highflier of Ide", the first post-war champion." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London

(Cravendale Crofter x Cravendale Cara)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1945 - "Nat.F.Ch. Ariel" won his third National Championship

Ariel, click to enlarge "Nat.F.Ch. Ariel"

(Air Pilot's Sam x Lullaby)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1947 - AKC Tracking Separated from Obedience Utility Class

"In 1947, Tracking was made a separate class. Until that time, it had been part of the Utility Dog obedience test." -- AKC Website, August 2000




ReturnReturn


1950s
1950s - Four Time National Specialty Winner - "Ch. Vilmar's Lucky"

Ch. Vilmar's Lucky, click to enlarge "Ch. Vilmar's Lucky"
"Breeder owned and handled, this marvelous liver and white dog won four consecutive National Specialty Best of Breeds, a record unmatched to this day. His first win came under Paul Palmer from the classes (1954) and his fourth was from Mrs. Dodge (1957). Shown 40 times, his other achievements include winning 38 BOBs, 28 Group 1's, 8 other group placements and 12 Best In Shows." ... "Ch. Vilmar's Lucky" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1975. -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-92, and American Pointer Club Website, 2000

(liver/white, w: March 1952, Ch. Captain Speck x Vilmar's Patty)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Specialty Winners]

(Webnote: Ch. Jason of Kinnike has 4 non-consecutive Nationals wins between 1984 and 1990)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1950s - First Solid Orange Champion - "Ch. Vilmar's Skogis Herta"

Ch. Vilmar's Skogis Herta, click to enlarge "Ch. Vilmar's Skogis Herta
"Ch. Vilmar's Skogis Herta" was the first solid orange to finish an AKC Championship. Breeder/Owner: Mary Wadsworth Rich. -- "Pointer Champions 1981-1986", Camino E. E. & B. Co.

(orange, w: July 26, 1949, Smaland's Skogis Viking x Ch. Prune's Own Temptation)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1950 - Bred-By-Exhibitor Class

"Early in 1950, the Bred-By-Exhibitor class came into being, as the Limit Class was dropped. This action confined the entry of imported dogs to the Open Class." -- AKC Website, 2002




1950 - Westminster Group I - "C P"

(???)
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1951 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Captain Speck"

(Captain Bob x Jean's Mistem)
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1954 - Field Trial Hall of Fame

"The Field Trial Hall of Fame was initiated in 1954, and since that time, each year, deserving dogs and worthy field trial personalities have been elected." -- American Field: The Sportsman Journal, Website, 2002

"Induction to the Field Trial Hall of Fame is an honor. The dogs were inducted based on their performance in trials and their ability to produce winning offspring. The Field Trial Hall of Fame is part of the National Bird Dog Museum located in Grand Junction, Tennessee." -- UplandBirdDog.com Website, 2002

Five pointers were inducted into the Field Trial Hall of Fame in 1954. "Fishel's Frank", "John Proctor", "Luminary", "Mary Montrose", and "Muscle Shoal's Jake".

(Fishel's Frank: w: 1904, Fishel's Rip Rap x Boy's Queen)
[Pedigree, etc.]

(1916 Nat.F.Ch. John Proctor: w: 1910, Fishel's Frank x Miss Mariutch)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]

(1942 Nat.F.Ch. Luminary: w: 1937, F.Ch. Doctor Blue Willing x Lullaby)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]

(3x Nat.F.Ch. Mary Montrose: w: 1915, Nat.F.Ch. Commanche Frank x Lorna Doone)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]

(F.Ch. Muscle Shoal's Jake: w: , Nat.F.Ch. Ferris Jake x Harris Lady Pauper)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Field Trial Championship Winners]




1958 - "Show Champion" Title Created (England)

"The Kennel Club did not create the title of "Show Champion" until 1958. Until that date, even if three challenge certificates had been awareded, a qualifier in the field was also required for the title. Today "Show Champion" means a dog has gained at least three challenge certificates but not won a Show Gundog Working Certificate (previously qualifier). A Champion is a dog with at least three challenge certificates, plus a qualifier in the field." -- Cicely A. Robertshaw, 2000, Pointer Past & Present




1958 - Crufts Best-in-Show - "Ch. Chiming Bells"

Ch. Chiming Bells, click to enlarge "Ch. Chiming Bells"
"Ch. Chiming Bells" was the first Pointer to go Supreme BIS at Crufts.

"In 1922 Ernest Scott sold to Bob Maloney of Pittsburg, U.S.A., a pointer bitch, "Ch. Lansdowne Prairie Queen". She became the foundation of the famous Herewithem Kennel and won the supreme award at Madison Square Garden's Championship Show (the Crufts of America). After the last war, to show something of his gratitude Bob Maloney gave Ernest Scott a pointer dog by the name of "Herewithem Royal Flush". Ernest soon won C.C.s and qualified him in the field to make him a champion. In one litter sired by Flush, Ernest picked out a bitch puppy which was eventually sold to 'Bill' Parkinson of Garstang. This bitch eventually became supreme champion at Crufts -- it was "Ch. Chiming Bells"." -- Edmondson and Robertshaw, 1978, The Pointer: Faber and Faber, London

(Sh. Ch. Herewithem Royal Flush x Pennine Pretence)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]
[Westminster Breed Winners]

(Webnote: "supreme award at Madison Square Garden's Championship show" does not refer to a BIS. However, in 1925, Bob Maloney won BIS with Governor Moscow,)




ReturnReturn


1960s
1960s - "Ch. Maryjays Majesty"

Ch. Maryjay's Majesty, click to enlarge "Ch. Maryjay's Majesty"
"During the 1960s this outstanding liver and white male, owned by Enos Phillips, won 124 Best of Breeds, 61 Group 1's, 36 other group placements, 13 Best in Shows and 2 Specialties. He played a major role in the foundation of the prepotent Truewithem bloodlines." "Ch. Maryjay's Majesty" won back-to-back National Specialties in 1963 and 1964. He was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1977. -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-92, American Pointer Club 1999 Specialty Catalogue, and American Pointer Club Website, 2000

(w: January 24, 1961, liver/white, Ch. Shelbark's Twenty Carats x Bryant's Buckeye Sterling)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Specialty Winners]




1960 - Current English Pointer Club formed

"Many years ago there had been a Pointer Club but the Club as we know it today was formed in 1960. Their first breed club championship show was held in 1963 at Crewe and was judged by Mr. Eric Seaman. He awarded best in show to "Sh. Ch. Waghorn Statesman", owned by Mrs. C. Lewis and the bitch challenge certificate winner was "Pennine Pleasure", owned by Arthur Eagglestone." -- C.R. Robertshaw, 2000, Pointer Past & Present




1964 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Crookrise Danny of Muick"

(Crookrise Joe x Stonethorpe Setaway)
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1966 - Crufts RBIS and Best Gundog - "Sh. Ch. Blakeshay Avant Tout"

(Sh. Ch. Millmeadow Maverick x Pennine Perky)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]




1967 - AKC "Best of Winners"

"In 1967, the independently judged Best of Winners class was eliminated. A system of judging Best of Winners during the judging for Best of Breed/Variety breed was adopted in its place. " -- AKC Website, August 2000




1968 - Revised AKC Pointer Breed Standard Approved

AKC Pointer Breed Standard approved November 12, 1968. -- information via AKC "The Complete Dog Book", 15th edition, 1977, including breed standards "corrected to May 1, 1975"

[AKC Pointer Breed Standard - 1968]




ReturnReturn


1970s
1970 - "Ch. Counterpoint's Lord Ashley" wins his 20th BIS

Counterpoint's Lord Ashley, click to enlarge "Ch. Counterpoint's Lord Ashley"
In 1970, "Ch. Counterpoint's Lord Ashley" set the current (and still) all-time Best-In-Show record for Pointer males, winning his 20th BIS. "Ashley" also was the Number One Sporting dog for 1970, and won the group twice at Westminster. He won the National Specialty twice, in 1965 and 1966, the first time being from the Open Dog class. "Counterpoint's Lord Ashley" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1992. -- information courtesy Nancy Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels, American Pointer Club 1999 Specialty Catalogue, and the American Pointer Club Website, 2000

(liver/white, Ch. Bryant's Buckeye Top Brass x Bryant's Buckeye Electra)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Specialty Winners]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1970 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Counterpoint's Lord Ashley"

Counterpoint's Lord Ashley, click to enlarge "Ch. Counterpoint's Lord Ashley"
(liver/white, Ch. Bryant's Buckeye Top Brass x Bryant's Buckeye Electra)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




1971 - Youngest AKC BIS Pointer - "Ch. Elfin Forest Tag of Lor"

The youngest BIS Pointer to date, at age 10 1/2 months, under judge Len Carey. He was still in the classes at the time. "Tag" was owned by Milt and Connie Taylor, of Portland, Oregon. -- information courtesy Connie B. Taylor, Lor Kennels, and Nancy Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels

(w: May 14, 1970, liver/white, Ch. Lamarde Perro Andres B x Ch. Lamarde Perro Effy B)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1973 - Crufts Best Gundog - "Sh. Ch. Daviam Titus Lartius"

"Sh. Ch. Daviam Titus Lartius" was England's "Pointer of the Year" in 1970, 1971, 1972, and 1973, "Stud Dog of the Year" in 1973, 1974, 1975, and 1976, and the top winning Pointer recordholder. Owned by Mr. & Mrs. William Parkinson. -- "Pointer Champions 1981-1986", by Camino E. E. & B., Co.

(Sh. Ch. Blenmar Caius Lucius x Melody of Humberdale)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]




1974 - American Pointer Club Hall of Fame

In 1974 the American Pointer Club created their "Hall of Fame". The first inductees were:

Mr. Mark Bryant
Geraldine R. Dodge
Robert F. Maloney
Paul Palmer
Ch. Bryants Buckeye Claudia
Ch. Drumgannon Dreadnought
Ch. Elstone Citidel
Ch. Finefield Covergirl
Ch. Governor Moscow

-- American Pointer Club Website, 2002




1975 - Revised AKC Pointer Breed Standard Approved

AKC Pointer Breed Standard approved November 11, 1975. -- information via AKC Website, March 2000

[AKC Pointer Breed Standard - 1975]




1978 - "Dual Ch. Scanpoint's Touch of Troll" whelped"

"The son of a Norwegian import, he is the first pointer to become champion in both show and field. This dog has also sired a dual champion." ... "Dual Ch. Scanpoint's Touch of Troll" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1984. -- Karen Blasche, "Proud Heritage", Pointer Points, vol.3-92, and American Pointer Club Website, 2000

(w: January 4, 1978, black/white, Ch. Ruten's Continuation x Ch. Scanpoint's Happy Landing)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1979 - First Orange and White National Specialty Winner - "Ch. Cumbrian Seabreeze"

Cumbrian Seabreeze, image courtesy Nancy and Henri Tuthill, click to enlarge "Ch. Cumbrian Seabreeze"
In 1979, under judge Mr. Jack Laythem, "Ch. Cumbrian Seabreeze" became the first orange and white pointer to win the National Specialty. -- information and image courtesy Nancy and Henri Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels

(orange/white, Ch. Toberdoney Gelert x Ch Sunset of Cumbrian)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Specialty Winners]




ReturnReturn


1980s
1983 - Top U.K. Gundog - "Sh. Ch. Peakdale Badger"

"Sh. Ch. Peakdale Badger" was the U.K. Top gundog in 1983. This title has not been won by a pointer since." -- information courtesy Donna McDougall /ADSTOCK, January 2001

(Hazelbarrow Dragoon x Billsborough Bullrush)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1984 - "Ch. Jason of Kinnike" wins his first (of four) Nationals Title

"Ch. Jason of Kinnike" wins the first of his four National Specialties, the others being in 1986, 1987, and 1990 (from the Veteran Dog Class). Only one other pointer has won four National Speciaties, that being "Ch. Vilmar's Lucky" between 1954 and 1957. "Ch. Jason of Kinnike" won his first (of eight) Best-In-Shows at age 14 months and his first National at 20 months. "Jason" also won seven Specialty Best of Breeds. -- American Pointer Club 1999 Specialty Catalogue and Erica Bandes, American Pointer Club 1997 Specialty Catalogue

(black/white, w: 1983, Ch. Kinnike LB Foolish O'Luftnase x Ch. Neonach Return to Vogue)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[National Specialty Winners]




1984 - "Ch. Cumbrian Black Pearl" breaks 48-year-old BIS record

Cumbrian Black Pearl, image courtesy Nancy and Henri Tuthill, click to enlarge "Ch. Cumbrian Black Pearl"
In 1984, "Ch. Cumbrian Black Pearl" broke the then current "All-Time" Best-In-Show record of Nancolleth Beryl of Giralda, set 48 years previously. In her career, "Black Pearl" won 22 Best-In-Shows and 84 Group Firsts. She was also the 1984 Number One Sporting Dog and Number Three All-Breeds. "Birdie" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1994. -- image and information courtesy Nancy and Henri Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels, and American Pointer Club's Website, 2000

(black/white, Ch. Marjetta Lord Carlton x Ch. Cumbrian Black Lace)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1986 - Banner Year for Pointers

"1986 was a banner year for Pointers worldwide. In England, the lovely bitch "Sh. Ch. Stonebridgelees Sultana" topped the Gundog Group at Crufts. In New Zealand, "Ch. Arista Brandon" took top honors at the New Zealand K.C.'s 100 Years Centennial Show. Here at home, "Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim" went Best in Show at the Westminster K.C." -- Marjorie Martorella, editor, The American Pointer Club, Inc., 1986 Yearbook"




1986 - Westminster Best-in-Show - "Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim"

Deputy, image courtesy Marjetta Kennels, click to enlarge "Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim"
"Deputy" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1990. -- American Pointer Club Website, 2000, image courtesy Marjorie Martorella, Marjetta Kennels

(w: February 6, 1981, liver/white, Ch. Firesign's Smackwater Jack x Ch. Truewithem A Taste Of Triumph)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]
[National Specialty Winners]




1986 - Crufts Best Gundog - "Sh. Ch. Stonebridgelees Sultana"

"She is not just the Bitch Record holder in the U.K. but the overall biggest winning pointer in the U.K. ever. She died 4 years ago but still holds the breed record for CC's. I believe that she won 30 CC's including the Gundog group at Crufts in 1986." -- information courtesy Donna McDougall /ADSTOCK, January 2001

(black/white, Peakdale Badger x Stonebridgelees Summertime)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]




1986 - New Zealand Kennel Club's 100 Years Centennial Year BIS - "NZ Gr. Ch. Arista Brandon"

(Aust/NZ Ch. Crookrise Firebrand x NZ Ch. Byzan Lark)




Mid 1980s - First Obedience Trail Champion - "OTCH & Am/Can Ch. Scanpoint Sunrise Serenade"

"OTCH" Competition began in _______, and to date, "OTCH & Am/Can Ch. Scanpoint Sunrise Serenade ("Sunny")" is the first and currently only Pointer to have obtained that title. "Sunny" was owned, trained, and shown by Lynn Deering, co-owned with Karin Ashe, and obtained her OTCH in 1984. "Sunny" was inducted into the American Pointer Club's Hall of Fame in 1986. -- "Pointer Points", 1985 Yearbook, and American Pointer Club Website, 2000

(w: May 4, 1978, orange/white, Ch. Ruten's Continuation x Ch. Scanpoint's Red Baroness)




Mid 1980s - First Junior Hunter - "Ch. Birnamwood Golden Gossamer, JH"

AKC's first Pointer to be awarded the Junior Hunting title. -- 1986 APC Yearbook

(orange/white, Am/Braz Ch. Kinnike Maitland x Ch. Marjetta A Toast To Victory)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1987 - "Dual Champion and American Field Champion Scanpoint's MacKenzie"

In 1987 DC/Amtr.Fld Ch. Scanpoint's MacKenzie was the first Pointer to finish his dual championship and his amateur field championship, making him the first Pointer to hold all three titles. Sired by Ch. Scanpoint's Charger x Sally Anna. Mac was trained and handled to his field titles by Steven L. Ashe and to his conformation title by Karin and Kristen Ashe. He was also a BOB winner of the top specials of his day. -- information courtesy Karin Ashe, Scanpoint Kennels

(Ch. Scanpoint's Charger x Sally Anna)




Late 1980s - First AKC and CKC Champion, Obedience, and Tracking Titles - "Can/Am Ch. Truewithem Lord Dupont, Can/Am CD, Can/Am TD"

Lord Dupont, BIS, image courtesy J. Koch, click to enlarge "Can/Am Ch. Truewithem Lord Dupont"
A Canadian BIS Pointer, "Ponty" was the first Pointer to obtain a Canadian and American TD title, and currently the only Pointer to have Championship (Ch.), Companion Dog (CD.), and Tracking Dog (TD) Titles in both Canada and the United States. -- Information and image courtesy Jill Koch, Nowwithem Kennels, Maple Ridge, British Columbia"

(w: June 27, 1986, liver/white, Am. Ch. Truewithem H. H. New Wave x Truewithem Moondream)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1989 - "Ch. Luftnase Albelarm Bee's Knees" - "Number One All Breeds"

In 1989, "Ch. Luftnase Albelarm Bees Knees" was the "Number One Dog - All Breeds" - defeating 54,899 dogs. "Bees" also won the APC National Specialty three times - in 1989, 1991, and 1992, and finished her career with 47 AKC Best-in-Shows, making her the #1 pointer, to date. She also had 3 BISS and 147 Group Firsts (AKC). "Bees" had 4 BIS in Canada. -- APC National Specialty Catalogue, 1990 and 2002, Nancy Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels, and Karen Blasche, APC Historian, 2002, and Dave Parks information from Linda Dietrich

(black/white, w: 1986, Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim x Ch. Luftnase Opulence)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]
[National Specialty Winners]




1970 - Westminster Group I - "Ch. Luftnase Albelarm Bee's Knees"

(black/white, w: 1986, Ch. Marjetta National Acclaim x Ch. Luftnase Opulence)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]




ReturnReturn


1990s
1992 - Westminster Champions Only

"As of 1992, the Show is limited to dogs who have earned their AKC champion of record title." -- Westminster Kennel Club Website, August 2000




1993 - The "Pointer Sisters" - "When Group Winning, Multiple Group Placing Littermates Team Together"

The Pointer Sisters, click to enlarge "Am/Can/Int'l Ch. Marjetta Picadilly Princess" and "Am/Can/Int'l Ch. Marjetta English Kate, Am. CD"
"When Group Winning, Multiple-Group Placing Littermates Team Together" In 20 brace competitions between March and December 1993, the "Pointer Sisters" won 6 Best-In-Show Braces and 19 Groups Firsts. Am/Can/Int'l Ch. Marjetta Picadilly Princess, "Penny" and Am/Can/Int'l Ch. Marjetta English Kate, CD, "Katie" were owned, trained, and shown by Lyn Topinka.

(w: November 16, 1989, orange/white, Ch. Marjetta Texas Gold of Ravica x Ch. Marjetta Maggie Mae)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1994 - AKC Agility Began




1995 - First UDX Pointer - "Ch. Scanpoint's Barefoot Contessa, UDX"

""Ch. Scanpoint's Barefoot Contessa, UD" of Margate, Florida completed her tenth combined Open and Utility qualifying legs and became the first pointer to win the title of UDX, Utility Dog Excellent!!! at the Imperial Polk Obedience Club trial in Tampa, Flordia, on March 5, 1995. Lynn Deering, the human companion who "Tessa" allows to share her king size bed, is overjoyed. It was a long haul but well worth it!" -- "Pointer Points" vol.2-95

(bitch, orange/white, Dual Ch./AFC Ch. Scanpoint's Mackenzie x Ch. Scanpoint's First Chance Kris)




1995 - AKC and CKC Champion and Hunting Titles - Liver with Tan Points - "Can/Am/Int'l Ch. Nowwithem Tried N True, JDJr, JH"

'Nowwithem Tried N True', image courtesy Jill Koch, click to enlarge "Can/Am/Int'l Ch. Nowwithem Tried N True, FDJr, JH"
Whelped in January 1995, "Tri" went on to become the first ever Canadian/American/International (IABCA) Champion with JH and FDJr titles, and one of the first "tan pointed" pointers to be shown in the Canada and the United States in many years. -- Images and information courtesy Jill Koch, Nowwithem Kennels, British Columbia, click images to enlarge

(w: January 22, 1995, liver/white with tan points, Can/Am Ch. Truewithem Lord Dupont, Can/Am CD, Can/Am TD x Nowwithem Little Sure Shot)
[Pedigree, etc.]




1996 and 1997 - "Ch. Albelarm's Bee Serious" - "Number One"

Albelarm Bee Serious, image courtesy Bee Serious website, click to enlarge "Ch. Albelarm Bee Serious"
"The Number One Pointer in the history of the breed by defeating more pointers in breed competition and winning more best of breeds than any other pointer ever. The Number One Pointer Dog* in the history of the breed based on Best Of Shows, Group Firsts, and group placement awards." During his career Elliot had 22 AKC Best-In-Shows and 122 Group Firsts. -- Den Lawler, Bee Serious Website, August 2000, and Nancy Tuthill, Cumbrian Kennels, and Karen Blasche, APC Historian, 2002 -- (* Based on AKC statistics computed by the Phillips Rating System)

(w: February 24, 1993, black/white, Ch. Windcliff Hanky Panky x Ch. Luftnase Albelarm's Bees Nees)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]
[National Specialty Winners]




1999 - "Ch. Sydmar the Heartless Wench" becomes the "All Time Top Producing Pointer Dam"

Sydmar the Heartless Wench, photo courtesy Sally Barton, click to enlarge "Ch. Sydmar the Hearless Wench"
In 1999, "Ch. Sydmar the Heartless Wench (Blair)" became the "All Time Top Producing Pointer Dam" with 31 finished offspring from 4 litters, including 2 National Specialty winners and 5 Best-In-Show dogs. Blair's sons and daughters have also taken numerous Awards of Merit at National Specialties and Westminster. Blair herself won the Veterans Class, Veterans Sweepstakes, and Best Brood Bitch at the 1998 National Specialty. -- information and image courtesy Sally Barton, Coralwood Kennels, 2001

(w: April 1989, Ch. Pipeaway the Ruthless Rake x Ch. Sydmar Crystalline)
[Pedigree, etc.]




ReturnReturn


2000s
2000 - "Best In Show - The Movie" - "Can/Am Ch. Nowwithem Accept No Substitute, CD, FD, JH"

Ace, image courtesy Jill Koch, click to enlarge "Can/Am Ch. Nowwithem Accept No Substitute, CD, FD, JH"
The pointer who was selected to win the sporting group in the movie "Best In Show" is "Can. Am. Ch. Nowwithem Accept No Substitute, CD, FD, JH" ("Ace"), shown by his breeder/owner/handler Jill Koch. The movie was filmed in Vancouver, British Columbia. -- image and information courtesy Jill Koch, Nowwithem Kennels, Maple Ridge, British Columbia

(dog, l/w, Can/Am Ch. Truewithem Lord Dupont, CD, TD, x Can/Am Ch. Harmony Lane Powder Keg)




2001 - Westminster AOM - Solid Liver - "Ch. Solivia's The Snowball Made It"

Ducky, image courtesy Susan Thompson, 
Solivia Pointers, click to enlarge "Ch. Solivia's The Snowball Made It"
"Ducky" is the first solid pointer to receive an Award of Merit at Westminster, under breeder judge Paula Nykiel. -- image courtesy Susan Thompson, Solivia Pointers, June 2001

(solid liver, w: 1998, Ch. Solivia's Why Be Normal x Ch. Solivia's Baby Bunting)
[Pedigree, etc.]




2001 - Crufts Best Gundog - "Sh. Ch. Calderside Love In A Mist At Whereathy"

Ellie, image courtesy Ria Nelis, Freebreeze Pointers, click to enlarge "Sh. Ch. Calderside Love In A Mist At Whereathy"
"The Crufts BOB winner, Helga Edmondson's "Sh. Ch. Calderside Love In A Mist at Whereathy" took the Gundog Group under Frank Kane. "Ellie" as she is known, topped an entry of 241 Pointers, judged by Janet Richards. She is orange and white, by "Ch Crookrise Old Glory" ex "Sherryton Lovebug at Calderside" and was bred by Graham and Dawn Ingham. DOB 2 Dec 1996." -- image and information courtesy Ria Nelis, Freebreeze Pointers, UK, June 2001

(Ch. Crookrise Old Glory x Sherryton Lovebug at Calderside)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Crufts Breed Winners]




2003 - First TDX Pointer - "Eclipse Final Fling Nthfld, JH, TDX"

On April 27, 2003 at the Buckeye Tracking Dog test near Cleveland, Ohio, Eclipse Final Fling Nthfld, JH added TDX to the end of her name, becoming the first pointer to earn that title.




2004 and 2005 - "OTCH MACH U-CD Longtrail Piece of My Heart UDX"

OTCH MACH2 U-CD Longtrail Piece of My Heart UDX
"Chamber", first pointer MACH (2004), first pointer MACH2 (2005), 2nd pointer OTCH (February, 2005), 2nd pointer UDX (February 2004), 22 High-In-Trials, 6 High-Combined, and one perfect 200 score on her way to her U-CD. Chamber was also the first pointer to earn the agility titles NAJ, AXJ, and MXJ. Owned and trained by Julie Hill.




2005 - "First Rally Title"

"Ch. Paladen Thru The Garden Gate, CDX, MH, RN"
Rally became an AKC titled event beginning January 1st, 2005. Two weeks later "Ch. Paladen Thru the Garden Gate, CDX, MH" became the first Rally titled pointer, adding a "Rally Novice (RN)" to her name.




2005 through 2008 - "Rally FIRSTS"

Lissa, heeling, Rally, click to enlarge "Ch. Redfern's Northern Mist, CDX, RAE5"
In January 2005, "Ch. Redfern's Northern Mist, CDX, RAE5", a.k.a. "Lissa", owned and trained by Lyn Topinka, and bred and co-owned by Pat Dart of Redfern Kennels, became the second pointer to earn a Rally Novice (RN) title. In February 2005 Lissa began a series of "FIRSTS" for pointers when she became the first pointer to earn the Rally Advanced (RA) title. In March 2005 she became the first pointer, and one of 3 dogs all-breed to finish their Rally Excellent (RE) titles on the West Coast. In April 2006, Lissa became the first pointer to earn the Rally Advanced Excellent (RAE) title, completing 10 "double Q's" in Rally Advanced and Rally Excellents. Since then Lissa was the first pointer (and the first all-breed in the Pacific Northwest) to earn their RAE2, RAE3, and RAE4 titles. In September 2008 Lissa joined only a handful of dogs, all-breed around the nation, to earn an "RAE5" title. That's 50 QQs !!!! . She also has earned her CDX.

(Ch. Phoenix All Fired Up x Ch. Saxon Rosebay Willowbay Redfern)
[Pedigree, etc.]




2008 - National Champion - "Ch. Cookieland Seasyde Hollyberry"

Cookieland Seasyde Hollyberry, click to enlarge "MBIS, MBISS, Ch. Cookieland Seasyde Hollyberry"
MBIS, MBISS, Ch. Cookieland Seasyde Hollyberry", a.k.a. "Holly", finished out 2008 as the second highest scoring dog in AKC conformation history, earning 117,199 points. As of January 2009, Holly had won 116 Best In Shows, more than any other Sporting Dog has ever won. A highlight of these BIS included twice winning the American Pointer Club National Specialty (2007 and 2008), and the 2008 Eukanuba National Championship. -- image courtesy Helyne Mederios, Seasyde Pointers; information subject to review

(Ch. Bee Serious Lord Jim x Ch. Cookieland's Life of Leisure)
[Pedigree, etc.]
[Westminster Breed Winners]
[National Specialty Winners]




ReturnReturn

RETURN to Pointer History and Trivia
RETURN to Pointer History and Pedigrees
RETURN to ""Home Page"
/PointerHistory/Trivia/pointer_trivia2.html
© Lyn Topinka, "EnglishRiverWebsite.com"
February 2009