English River Website
Pointer History and Pedigrees
"Tri-Colors" - "Golden Cheeks" - "Tan Markings"

NOTE: this list not worked on since December 2003

History
Source: Rawdon B. Lee, 1893, A History and Description of the Modern Dogs (Sporting Division) of Great Britain and Ireland

"Some of the oldest of our modern kennels have their foundation from the stock purchased at the Edge sale in 1845 ... The Edge strain appears to have been pretty well distinct from the others, and has proved of infinite benefit to the admirers of the pointer who followed him. His were medium-sized but particularly elegantly moulded dogs, dark liver and white in colour, with more than a tendency to a golden or bronze shading on the cheeks. They carried their heads well in the field, and in work were quite equal to what they were in appearance."

"Mr. Brailsford ... says that two of the best dogs in the Edge kennels in 1841-2 were "Rake" and "Romp", but the latter, having tan shadings on his liver-marked cheeks, was not much used for breeding purposes. Thus, even so far back as half a century ago, a purely fancy point was not sneered at by even the greatest of breeders. The Edge strain was in the first instance obtained by judicious crossing with dogs and bitches obtained from Captain White, Mr. Hurts, of Alderwasley, Mr. Mundy, Mr. G. Moore, Mr. Statham, Sir R. Goodrich, and others. All colours but liver and white were rigourously excluded, and the leading feature of the Edge strain lay in its general uniformity. The best specimens only were saved; the kennels were never overcrowded, and no more dogs than could be used and properly trained for the owner's own requirements were kept."


Source: A.F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer

"One of the characteristics of the Edge strain was that all the progeny were liver, white and ticked, many of them being endowed with golden or bronze shading on the cheeks. The liver was a very deep brown, and the flecks in the white were sharp. Lemon and whites and black and whites were entirely unknown among the direct descendents of the Edge blood."

"Brockton's Bounce" never sired any of the latter colors, even when bred to bitches of these markings, and while he himself did not have the tan cheek shadings, many of his puppies were marked in this manner. The late Mr. Brailsford, a prominent English trainer of those days, was well acquainted with the Edge dogs just before their dispersal in October, 1844, and he stated to Mr. Lee, author of "Modern Dogs," that he knew all the dogs in the kennels for several years prior to Mr. Edge's death. He mentioned having seen "Rake" and "Romp" in 1841 and '42. "Rake" is the dog which the Duke of Portland purchased at the dispersal sale. Mr. Brailsford is very explicit in this interview in the description of this pair of pointers and among other details he mentions that both had tan cheek shadings."

"As it may be necessary to allude to the Edge pointers ... it might be well to digress here long enough to say that Thomas Webb Edge founded his strain by the judicious crossing of dogs and bitches obtained from Captain White, Mr. Hurst, Mr. Mundy, G.Moore (who brought some of them back at the dispersal sale), Mr. Statham, Sir Richard Goodrich and others. All colors were rigorously excluded except liver and whites, in whic, however, the occasional tan cheek markings cropped out, but one of the leading features of the strain was its uniformity. The best specimens only, were saved. The kennel was never overcrowded and no more dogs than could be used and trained for the owner's purposes were retained. That "Brockton's Bounce" was a direct descendent from this well known kennel, seems now to be generally conceded."


Source: W.E. Phillips, 1970, The True Pointer and His Ancient Heritage, p.33-36, some paragraphs from source omitted above for brevity

"The best bird dogs I have ever owned stemmed from "Comanche Frank" and showed the golden cheek markings, hallmark of the famous Webb Edge strain. "Brockton's Bounce" gave this birthmark to his grandson, "Price's Ch. Bang", who founded what is today the only strain of pointers either here or in England which can match their ancestors in form and performance."

"Arkwright in his work questioned the blood of dogs of such markings. He gave as his chief reason that no mention was ever made of them in the old books. He, like many other writers on dog matters, omitted certain evidence. His marvelous book was influenced by his apparent dislike of the dogs of Devonshire with their golden cheek markings and what he wrote injured their reputation."

"In Cynographia Britannica 1805, Sydenham Edwards writes this of the Spanish pointer: 'Head, large indent between the eyes, ears thin, loose and hanging down, of moderate length, coat short and smooth, color dark brown liver color, liver and white, red and white, black, black and white, sometimes tanned about the face and eyes, often thickly speckled with small spots on white ground, tail smooth and wiry.'"

"Sydney Gilpin painted Colonel Thornton's pointers about 1800 and in several instances showed dogs with the golden cheek markings. Thornton's dogs, we are told by Lee, formed the basic blood of the Webb Edge strain. Ferneley in 1824 painted Ben Marshall and his black pointer showing tan cheek markings. Henry Alken about 1835 painted excellent pointers showing the tan or golden markings. Notwithstanding Arkwright to the contrary, these are the facts."

"For some reason, the excellence of the Italian and French pointers seems to have been overlooked by the early writers, but Arkwright is positive in his statements that the English pointer was as an individual variety the result of breeding the Spanish pointer to the dogs brought from France. Lee agrees with this reasoning, and it seems absurd to believe that intelligent breeders, if they wished to improve the speed of the slow going Spaniard, would use a dog of the hound breed when the light, fast racing type pointers from France were well established in England at the time."

"Arkwright's chapter on characteristics says, 'I suspect the get of liver or black and white dogs with tan markings about them because I have never seen a typical of this motley and because though I have repeatedly crossed yellow with liver and black and white and liver and whites with blacks I have never bred one single tri-colored puppy; and because there is no mention of them in old books.' Arkwright lists among two books consulted in preparation of his work, Cynopraphia Britannica, which plainly states, referring to the Spanish dog, 'sometimes tanned about the face and eyes.' At this time it should be noted that a marked characteristic of the period was golden cheek markings which were in evidence in the "Bang" strain. One, "Jingo" was so marked and many famous dogs of the "Bang" strain have been thus marked and they were all great dogs on game."

"Arkwright was as his work shows a sincere student, and his conclusion relative to the ancestors of the latter day English pointer is we believe in line with the evidence. Lee agrees with Arkwright and pictorial evidence supplies the proof. Now in light of the fact that the English dog was produced by a mixture of Spanish and French blood, certainly Arkwright is unreasonable when he expects such characteristics as the coat of two lengths as shown by Reinagle and the bronze cheek shadings as related by Sydenham Edwards in the Spanish breed to disappear at once."

"Even to this day we find a variation in coat and the bronze cheek markings persist (five dogs in my own kennel) and it is no indication of alien blood."


Source: W.E. Phillips, 1970, The True Pointer and His Ancient Heritage, p.58

"When all is said and done, the shadow of "Price's Ch. Bang", probably the greatest studforce ever created in the animal kingdom, hangs over and puts in the shade all others. The story began when Francis mated his bitch "Belle" to "Brockton's Bounce", a dog by all reports strong in the famous blood noted for its golden cheek markings. Many dogs strong in "Comanche Frank" carried this identification."


Source: AKC Pointer Breed Standard, Approved November 11, 1975
From: American Kennel Club Website, March 2000

Color: Liver, lemon, black, orange; either in combination with white or solid-colored. A good Pointer cannot be a bad color. In the darker colors, the nose should be black or brown; in the lighter shades it may be lighter or flesh-colored.

Source: Canadian Kennel Club Offical Breed Standard,
From: Pointer Club of Canada Website, May 2002

Colour: Liver, lemon, black, orange; either in combination with white or solid-coloured. A good Pointer cannot be a bad colour. In the darker colours, the nose should be black or brown; in the lighter shades it may be lighter or flesh-coloured.

Source: Kennel Club, London, 1994 F.C.I. Standard No.1 A.N.K.C., 1998
From: Australian National Kennel Club Website, March 2000

Colour: Usual colours are lemon and white, orange and white, liver and white, and black and white. Self colours and tri-colours are also correct.

Pedigrees
Tan Markings - "Golden Cheeks"


  • Bang (see: Price's Bang)


  • Brockton's Bounce and the Edge of Strelly Strain
    (liver/white)
    "One of the characteristics of the Edge strain was that all the progeny were liver, white and ticked, many of them being endowed with golden or bronze shading on the cheeks. The liver was a very deep brown, and the flecks in the white were sharp. Lemon and whites and black and whites were entirely unknown among the direct descendents of the Edge blood. "Brockton's Bounce" never sired any of the latter colors, even when bred to bitches of these markings, and while he himself did not have the tan cheek shadings, many of his puppies were marked in this manner." -- A. F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer


  • Count Fauster
    (liver, white, tan, source: Taylor, 1907, p.81, derby in 1888)


  • Edge of Strelly Lines -- see Brockton's Bounce entry above




  • F.Ch. Jingo
    (dog, liver/white with tan cheek markings, w: April 14, 1891, source: Hochwalt, 1922)
    ""Jingo" was a white and liver dog with tan cheek markings; a sturdily-built pointer with a fair head, good neck and well-made shoulders, but he was not constructed on bench show lines. He was the workman all over. There was little of the finer finish about him, and yet he was a dog which indicated, from every angle you looked at him, that he was a utility dog. He was a pointer that would catch the eye of the field man at once. In the field he was considered, by competent critics, to be the wisest dog of his time on game. His bird sense, his power of location, and his almost supernatural instincts in seeking out the birdy places, were something marvelous." -- A.F. Hochwalt, 1923, The Modern Pointer




  • Price's Bang
    (w: 1872, liver/white "with gold cheek markings", source: W.E. Phillips, 1970)
    Champion Price's Bang, from W.E. Phillips, click to enlarge "Price's Champion Bang"
    Image scanned from W.Enos Phillips, The True Pointer and His Ancient Heritage
    "The best bird dogs I have ever owned stemmed from "Comanche Frank" and showed the golden cheek markings, hallmark of the famous Webb Edge strain. "Brockton's Bounce" gave this birthmark to his grandson, "Price's Ch. Bang", who founded what is today the only strain of pointers either here or in England which can match their ancestors in form and performance." -- W.E. Phillips, 1970, The True Pointer and His Ancient Heritage


  • Mr. Saddleton's Don
    (dog, liver/white/tan on cheeks, source: EKC, March 1881)


  • Waddell's Dream
    (bitch, black/white/tan, w: 1874, source: AKC Studbook, Vol.I)

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© Lyn Topinka, English River Website
December 2003